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Shots - Health News

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Nearly a third of adults in the U.S. have gotten at least one shot of the COVID-19 vaccine so far, but researchers warn that vaccine refusal may keep the country from reaching herd immunity. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Vaccine Refusal May Put Herd Immunity At Risk, Researchers Warn

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Since the pandemic began, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been managing a massive public health response, reaching every part of the U.S. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Inside The CDC's Battle To Defeat The Virus

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Dialysis clinics are often located in areas that are underserved by other forms of health care. And many already vaccinate their patients against other illnesses. Bruno Maccanti Pescador/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Maccanti Pescador/Getty Images

Florida's Pasco County Health Department and the Army National Guard partnered with Fellowship Church in Tampa, Fla., to help city residents age 65 and older get immunized with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in February. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Octavio Jones/Getty Images

With precautions such as mask-wearing in place, experts predict travel is among the activities that may become safer by this summer. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Future Of The Pandemic In The U.S.: Experts Look Ahead

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Dr. Hansel Tookes made sure his first dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami on Dec. 15. was televised, as a way to combat hesitancy. Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Black And Latinx Americans Are Embracing COVID-19 Vaccination

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Jeremy Leung for NPR

Groceries And Rent Money: Why Support For COVID Isolation Is More Important Than Ever

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Many hospitals, including Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif., reported reaching capacity in their ICUs during the winter surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations. These conditions, according to research, may have led to more deaths. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Even with some colleges canceling their midsemester breaks due to COVID-19, students from more than 200 schools are expected to visit Miami Beach during spring break, which runs until mid-April. Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Planning A Spring Break? These 5 Tips Can Help Minimize Risk

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The Aldaco family of Phoenix suffered multiple losses in this year of unfathomable pain. Three brothers perished in the pandemic: Jose (left) in July, Heriberto Jr. (right) in December and Gonzalo (holding guitar) in February. They appear in this undated family photo with their father (second from left). Miguel Lerma hide caption

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Miguel Lerma

In The Pandemic's 1st Year, 3 Huge Losses In 1 Family

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A health care worker at a drive-through site in Greenville, Miss., administers a COVID-19 vaccine shot in January. Mississippi was one of the first states to add a body mass index of 30 or more (a rough gauge of obesity) to its current list of qualifying medical conditions for vaccine eligibility. Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Agnes Boisvert, an ICU nurse at St. Luke's hospital in downtown Boise, Idaho, spends every day trying to navigate between two worlds. One is a swirl of beeping monitors, masked emotion and death; the other, she says, seems oblivious to the horrors occurring every hour of every day. Isabel Seliger for NPR hide caption

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

In early September 2020, Seattle, Wash., had some of the worst air quality in the world because of wildfire smoke. The city was among the first to create smoke shelters for the most vulnerable. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

As the speed of COVID vaccinations picks up, so do the reports of doses going to waste. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Accidentally Trashed, Thawed Or Expired: Reports Of COVID-19 Vaccine 'Spoilage' Grow

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A health care worker draws a dose of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe for an immunization event in the parking lot of the L.A. Mission on Feb. 24. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Could A Single-Dose Of COVID-19 Vaccine After Illness Stretch The Supply?

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Before conducting the nasal swab test for COVID-19 at the Rantoul, Ill., clinic, researchers go out to greet each visitor and ask for basic identification and health information. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

To Help Farmworkers Get COVID-19 Tests And Vaccine, Build Trust And A Safety Net

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Restrictions on public gatherings and indoor dining, as well as improved rates of mask-wearing and social distancing helped bring down the rate of new coronavirus infections in the U.S. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

At a Kedren Community Health Center vaccine clinic in South Central Los Angeles this month, 89-year-old Cecilia Onwytalu (center) signals she's more than ready to get her immunization against COVID-19. Apu Gomes/Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/Getty Images

Race Versus Time: Targeting Vaccine To The Most Vulnerable Is No Speedy Task

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On Jan. 19, the incoming Biden administration hosted memorial to lives lost to COVID-19 at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. Since then another 100,000 Americans have died. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jodee Pineau-Chaisson sits in her office in Springfield, Mass., on Jan. 12. Pineau-Chaisson, a social worker, contracted the coronavirus last May and continues to have symptoms even months after testing negative for the virus. Meredith Nierman/GBH News hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/GBH News

When Does COVID-19 Become A Disability? 'Long-Haulers' Push For Answers And Benefits

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Nurse Modesta Littleman vaccinates patient Peter Sulewski in late January, on the first day of vaccinations at a clinic run by Health Care for the Homeless in Baltimore. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Vaccinating Homeless Patients Against COVID-19: 'All Bets Are Off'

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Shots - Health News

Shots

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