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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hasn't budged on its guidance that vaccinated people can skip mask-wearing, but some local governments faced with surging cases are going back to mandates, such as Los Angeles County, which recently mandated indoor mask use, including at places like bars and restaurants. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

People enjoy an outdoor art exhibition in downtown Los Angeles in early July. Los Angeles County public health authorities are now urging unvaccinated and vaccinated people alike to wear face coverings in public indoor spaces because of the growing threat posed by the more contagious delta variant. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Pop star Olivia Rodrigo makes a brief statement to reporters Wednesday in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gen Z Is Feeling 'Meh' About The Vaccine. The White House Is Calling In The Pop Stars

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U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, who has helped the U.S. through other crises like the Zika outbreak, is now taking on health misinformation around COVID-19, which he says continues to jeopardize the country's efforts to beat back the virus. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The U.S. Surgeon General Is Calling COVID-19 Misinformation An 'Urgent Threat'

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Raul Gomez sells Mexican flags Tuesday before the U.S. and Mexico national teams face off in the CONCACAF Nations League finals at Mile High Stadium. Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite hide caption

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Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite

Fútbol, Flags And Fun: Getting Creative To Reach Unvaccinated Latinos In Colorado

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Duy Nguyen/NPR

Where Are The Newest COVID Hot Spots? Mostly Places With Low Vaccination Rates

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Thousands gathered for a three-day country music festival in western Colorado in late June. Cases of the delta variant of the coronavirus are spreading quickly in the area, but the public health department said that, by the time the risk had become clear, it was too late to cancel Country Jam. Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN

Promotora Gladis Lopez engages community members on June 23 at the Crossroads Farmers Market located at the border of Takoma Park and Langley Park, an area of suburban Maryland with a large Latino population. Ian Morton/NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton/NPR

Meet Maryland's Secret Weapon In The Battle To Close The Latino Vaccination Gap

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She coordinates COVID-19 vaccinations at a federally subsidized clinic in Linden, Tenn., but nurse Kirstie Allen has not gotten the vaccine herself. She wants to wait and see first. In Tennessee, 42% of adults have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

As COVID Vaccinations Slow, Parts Of The U.S. Remain Far Behind 70% Goal

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This photomicrograph depicts Leishmania donovani parasites contained within a canine bone marrow cell. One of the more dangerous of 20 different species of Leishmania, L. donovani is endemic to parts of India, Africa, and South-West Asia. Dr. Francis W. Chandler/CDC hide caption

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Dr. Francis W. Chandler/CDC

After experiencing a suicidal crisis earlier this year, Melinda, a Massachusetts 13-year-old, was forced to remain 17 days in the local hospital's emergency room while she waited for a space to open up at a psychiatric treatment facility. She was only allowed to use her phone an hour a day in the ER; her mom visited daily, bringing books and special foods. Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother

Kids In Mental Health Crisis Can Languish For Days Inside ERs

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned on Tuesday of the danger from the Delta variant of the coronavirus. Among those not yet vaccinated, Delta may trigger serious illness in more people than other variants do. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Fauci Warns Dangerous Delta Variant Is The Greatest Threat To U.S. COVID Efforts

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A sticker reads, "I got vaccinated," at a vaccination site inside Penn Station last month in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

New York City Has Been Slow To Vaccinate Homebound Elderly, Causing More Sickness

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The infectious and contagious rabies virus, shown here in a colorized micrograph, can be transmitted to humans through the bite or saliva of an infected animal. Thanks to protective vaccination of pets, rabies was eliminated from the U.S. dog population in 2007, though a bite from infected bats, skunks and raccoons can still transmit the virus. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Science Source

The U.S. Bans Importing Dogs From 113 Countries After Rise In False Rabies Records

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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Anti-Vaccine Activists Use A Federal Database To Spread Fear About COVID Vaccines

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

States Scale Back Pandemic Reporting, Stirring Alarm

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Poverty and disability are linked to lower vaccination rates in some rural communities. The Vaccination Transportation Initiative sponsored van helps rural residents get the COVID-19 vaccine in rural Mississippi. The effort works to overcome the lack of transportation and access to technology for rural residents. Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Therapist Kiki Radermacher was one of the first members of a mobile crisis response unit in Missoula, Mont., which started responding to emergency mental health calls last year. That pilot project becomes permanent in July and is one of six such teams in the state — up from one in 2019. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

A movie released online by Children's Health Defense, an anti-vaccine group headed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr., resurfaces disproven claims about the dangers of vaccines and targets its messages at Black Americans who may have ongoing concerns about racism in medical care. Iryna Veklich/Getty Images hide caption

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Iryna Veklich/Getty Images

An Anti-Vaccine Film Targeted To Black Americans Spreads False Information

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In 2020, many state and local health departments ramped up hiring staff to do contact tracing. Joseph Ortiz was working as a contact tracer in New York City last summer. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Why Contact Tracing Couldn't Keep Up With The U.S. COVID Outbreak

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Delta Health Center, in rural northwest Mississippi, was founded in the 1960s and is one of the country's first community health centers. Delta's leaders say community health centers all over the U.S. are trusted institutions which can help distribute COVID-19 vaccines. Shalina Chatlani/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Shalina Chatlani/Gulf States Newsroom

Yvette Richards, director of community connection at St. James United Methodist Church in Kansas City, Mo., checks temperatures before Sunday morning services. The church is hosting vaccination clinics and holding socially distanced services after shutting down for much of the pandemic. Carlos Moreno/KCUR hide caption

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Carlos Moreno/KCUR

In Missouri And Other States, Flawed Data Makes It Hard To Track Vaccine Equity

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