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Shots - Health News

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Dr. Danielle Hairston, a psychiatry residency director at Howard University in Washington, D.C., trains and mentors young black doctors. Quraishia Ford hide caption

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Quraishia Ford

To Be Young, A Doctor And Black: Overcoming Racial Barriers In Medical Training

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A new interactive map and dashboard lets you find out how bad your county's coronavirus outbreak is. Harvard Global Health Institute/Microsoft AI/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Harvard Global Health Institute/Microsoft AI/Screenshot by NPR

Green, Yellow, Orange Or Red? This New Tool Shows COVID-19 Risk In Your County

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Dr. Danielle Ofri, author of When We Do Harm: A Doctor Confronts Medical Error, says medical mistakes are likely to increase as resource-strapped hospitals treat a rapid influx of COVID-19 patients. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A Doctor Confronts Medical Errors — And Flaws In The System That Create Mistakes

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NPR

As Coronavirus Surges, How Much Testing Does Your State Need To Subdue The Virus?

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How Mutations In The Coronavirus May Affect Development Of A Vaccine

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Kai Koerber, a rising sophomore at the University of California, Berkeley, is a survivor of the 2018 mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Since then, he says, he's made promoting a mental health curriculum in high schools and colleges a personal priority. Brittany Hosea-Small hide caption

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Brittany Hosea-Small

Plastic fencing and landscaping boulders replaced homeless campsites on this block in downtown Denver. Advocates for the homeless fear that displacing encampments risks spreading the coronavirus throughout the homeless community. Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News

People leave a train at the central station in Frankfurt, Germany, on Thursday. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

How Germany Staffed Up Contact Tracing Teams To Contain Its Coronavirus Outbreak

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Spray parks, like this one in Washington, D.C., have become popular places for people to cool off in the heat of summer. But this year, fears over the coronavirus mean that some cities are re-evaluating whether to keep them open. Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images

Cities Brace For 'Collision Course' Of Summer Heat Waves And COVID-19

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As normal activities such as dining out resume, there has been an increase in cases in people in their 20s and 30s in pockets around the country. Some experts say it's because of lack of social distancing and mask wearing. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Younger Adults Are Increasingly Testing Positive For The Coronavirus

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Demonstrators on both sides of the abortion debate rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Jan. 19, 2018. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Im

Study Examines The Lasting Effects Of Having — Or Being Denied — An Abortion

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Health workers and others rallied in Seattle during a Doctors For Justice event on June 6, protesting police brutality in the wake of George Floyd's death. Medical training needs a hard look too, doctors say: Students of color and LGBTQ people often bear the brunt of what can be a bullying culture. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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Drivers line up for COVID-19 testing in the Sherman Oaks neighborhood of Los Angeles in May. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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What Zebra Mussels Can Tell Us About Errors In Coronavirus Tests

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Visitors stand in line during Project Unity's "Together We Test" coronavirus testing at a Friendship-West Baptist Church campus in Dallas, Texas on May 28, 2020. Cooper Neill for NPR hide caption

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Cooper Neill for NPR

To Combat Disparities, Black Churches In Dallas Offer Coronavirus Testing

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

Coronavirus 2nd Wave? Nope, The U.S. Is Still Stuck In The 1st One

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Kelly Womochil, an aide at Enterprise Estates Nursing Center in Enterprise, Kan., tries on a poncho that the Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending to nursing homes to protect against the coronavirus. Pamela Black hide caption

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Pamela Black

People working as medics near the Colorado State Capitol on May 31, during one of Denver's many protest demonstrations in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minneapolis. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Debbie Sorensen, an infectious disease nurse with Salt Lake County Public Health Department in Salt Lake City, talks by phone with a woman who recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Sorensen is one of the county's 130 contact tracers aiming to slow the spread of COVID-19. Andrew Becker/ KUER hide caption

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Andrew Becker/ KUER
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