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Shots - Health News

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The mouthpiece of a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) device delivers enough pressurized air to keep the breathing passage of someone who has obstructive sleep apnea open throughout the night. Dr P. Marazzi/Science Source hide caption

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Dr P. Marazzi/Science Source

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has been a fixture at most of the president's daily coronavirus task force press briefings. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Prepare For Outbreaks Like New York's In Other States, Warns Anthony Fauci

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Doctors test a hospital staffer Tuesday for coronavirus, in a triage tent that's been set up outside the E.R. at St. Barnabas hospital in the Bronx. Hospital workers are at higher risk of getting COVID-19, and public health experts fear a staffing shortage in the U.S. is coming. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Getty Images

States Get Creative To Find And Deploy More Health Workers In COVID-19 Fight

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Dr. Esther Johnston of HealthPoint Community Health Center says her clinic in Auburn, Washington has overhauled how it sees patients, shifting resources away from routine primary care to pandemic response by necessity. Will Stone for NPR hide caption

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Will Stone for NPR

Coronavirus testing capacity has begun to expand, with drive-through testing starting up in many places. But experts warn we still need to vastly expand testing to control the outbreak. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using supercomputers to calculate which drugs may help in the fight against the coronavirus. Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory hide caption

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Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Transmission electron micrograph of particles of SARS-CoV-2 — the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID/Flickr

Why Hoarding Of Hydroxychloroquine Needs To Stop

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"If we're not able to address the short-term cash needs of rural hospitals, we're going to see hundreds ... close before this crisis ends," warns the head of the National Rural Hospital Association. "This is not hyperbole." Cavan Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images

In Manhattan, Isiah Turner isn't particularly worried about the outbreak. Other than continuously washing his hands and cleaning, he says, "it's just another day." (Right) Ali Sky isn't worried about her own health but says, "I'm really worried about my husband." Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

A handful of untraceable cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in the Netherlands alerted public health researchers that the virus may be spread by people with mild symptoms early in the progression of the illness. Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images

The USNS Comfort, seen in 2017, is one of two U.S. Navy hospital ships, along with the USNS Mercy, that are preparing to deploy to assist medical workers expecting to grapple with an influx of patients in the weeks to come. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The normally busy transportation hub at the World Trade Center in Manhattan was sparsely populated on Monday. The governors of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut have banned all gatherings of 50 or more people. Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images

New Analysis Suggests Months Of Social Distancing May Be Needed To Stop Virus

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MedStar Washington Hospital Center's "ready room" in Washington, D.C., has mostly been used to house emergency supplies — but some storage carts have been moved out to make way for patient assessment stations. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Are U.S. Hospitals Ready?

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A member of the custodial staff at Los Angeles' Union Station, taking extra care in the waiting area — all part of enhanced cleaning efforts at major transit hubs in response to COVID-19. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Depending on your health status, you may need to isolate, self-quarantine or simply practice social distancing. All these measures slow community transmission of the coronavirus. Camilo Fuentes Beals/EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Camilo Fuentes Beals/EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

Ventilators can be a temporary bridge to recovery — many patients in critical care who need them for help breathing get better. Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images hide caption

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Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images

As The Pandemic Spreads, Will There Be Enough Ventilators?

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Shots - Health News

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