Treatments : Shots - Health News Here you can find out how the practice of medicine is changing. We pull together the latest research on medical tests, drugs and other therapies.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

Treatments

This colorized scanning electron micrograph shows human cells in a lab infected with "pink" influenza viruses. As many as 650,000 people each year die from flu, according to the World Health Organization. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Spravato, the brand name for esketamine, a newly approved option for treatment-resistant depression. Janssen Pharmaceutica hide caption

toggle caption
Janssen Pharmaceutica

FDA Approves Esketamine Nasal Spray For Hard-To-Treat Depression

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700509903/700625608" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles (orange) infecting a T cell, one of the white blood cells that play a central role in the immune system. Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Science Source

Bone Marrow Transplant Renders Second Patient Free Of HIV

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700361887/700380138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Given supportive, nurturing conditions, highly reactive "orchid" children can thrive when tackling challenges, pediatrician and author Thomas Boyce says, especially if they have the comfort of a regular routine. Michael H/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael H/Getty Images

Is Your Child An Orchid Or A Dandelion? Unlocking The Science Of Sensitive Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/699979387/700126425" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Reports of problems with transvaginal mesh implanted to treat pelvic floor disorders and incontinence in women have led the Food and Drug Administration to scrutinize the product more carefully. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

FDA Tightening Regulatory Requirements For Some Medical Devices

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689739642/699965272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In their classic radio show, Car Talk, hosts Ray and Tom Magliozzi, demonstrated what some doctors consider an ideal example of the thinking doctors need to learn to make a good medical diagnosis. Liz Linder/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Liz Linder/WBUR

The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Carol Marley, a hospital nurse with private insurance, says coping with the financial fallout of her pancreatic cancer has been exhausting. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Gorman/KHN

Cancer Complications: Confusing Bills, Maddening Errors And Endless Phone Calls

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696321475/698342904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jeannette Parker, an animal-loving biologist, stopped to feed a stray cat in a rural area outside Florida's Everglades National Park. Instead of showing appreciation, the cat bit her. Angel Valentín for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Angel Valentín for KHN

Cat Bites The Hand That Feeds; Hospital Bills $48,512

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697786766/698043763" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists have isolated a molecule with disease-fighting potential in a microbe living on a type of fungus-farming ant (genus Cyphomyrmex). The microbe kills off other hostile microbes attacking the ants' fungus, a food source. Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin

A team of researchers in Boston has developed an insulin-delivery system that injects the medicine directly into the stomach wall, which is painless. Felice Frankel/MIT hide caption

toggle caption
Felice Frankel/MIT

Avoiding The Ouch: Scientists Are Working On Ways To Swap The Needle For A Pill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692331050/692466463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Combining some common antidepressants and opioids can undercut the relief of the painkillers. Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images

The Joliet Treatment Center, southwest of Chicago, is one of four facilities now providing mental health care to some of Illinois' sickest inmates. It's a start, say mental health advocates, but many more inmates in Illinois and across the U.S. still await treatment. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Dieter Egli, a developmental biologist at Columbia University, and Katherine Palmerola examine a newly fertilized egg injected with a CRISPR editing tool. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Stein/NPR

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689623550/690603652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After scientists screened over 8,000 genes in fruit flies, only one, which hadn't been described before, triggered sleepiness. Andrew Syred/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Syred/Science Source

The drugs clonazepam and diazepam are both benzodiazepines; they're better known by the brand names Klonopin and Valium. The drug class also includes Ativan, Librium and Halcion. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Getty Images

Chronic pain is just one health concern women can struggle with after giving birth. Some who have complicated pregnancies or deliveries can experience long-lasting effects to their physical and mental health, researchers find. Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images

When a former patient died from a lethal combination of methadone and Benadryl, Dr. Ako Jacintho got a letter from the state medical board. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/687376371/687951190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

About