Treatments : Shots - Health News Here you can find out how the practice of medicine is changing. We pull together the latest research on medical tests, drugs and other therapies.

Bea and Doug Duncan outside their home in Natick, Mass. The coaching they got from the Community Reinforcement and Family Training program, they say, gave them tools to help their son Jeff stick to his recovery from drug use. He's 28 now and has been sober for nine years. Robin Lubbbock/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Robin Lubbbock/WBUR

Inducing labor at 39 weeks may involve IV medications and continuous fetal monitoring. But if the pregnancy is otherwise uncomplicated, mother and baby can do just fine, the latest evidence suggests. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636428119/636854791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

About a decade ago, the FDA started requiring drugmakers to add black box warnings to labels and prescribing information for Seroquel and other antipsychotic drugs. The agency made the change after the medications were linked to an increased risk of death among elderly dementia patients. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'Dear Doctor' Letters Use Peer Pressure, Government Warning To Stop Overprescribing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636184559/636237846" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Feranmi Okanlami, a doctor at Michigan Medicine, became partially paralyzed after an accident in 2013, during his medical residency. Courtesy of Jina Sawani/University of Michigan hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jina Sawani/University of Michigan

Evelyn Nussembaum and her son Sam Vogelstein pick up a six month supply of Epidiolex from the experimental pharmacy at UCSF. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Lesley McClurg/KQED

How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/632469743/635907987" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jazz legend Billie Holiday at a recording session in 1957. Holiday's pioneering vocal style played with tempo, phrasing and pitch to stir hearts. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/632243103/632411345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Having more than one child is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's, research finds, as is starting menstruation earlier in life than average and menopause later. Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images

Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630688342/631626895" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jose and Elaine Belardo's lives were upended last year when he was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Smith/KCUR

How Soon Is Soon Enough To Learn You Have Alzheimer's?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630639054/631350013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists are in the early stages of developing new tests that could predict accurately if a woman is at risk of delivering her baby early. Steve Debenport/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Debenport/Getty Images

An early prototype of the silicon-chip-sized particle accelerator that physicists at Stanford are working on. Eventually, miniature accelerators might have a role in radiating tumors, the scientists say. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Physicists Go Small: Let's Put A Particle Accelerator On A Chip

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630101228/630246579" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

toggle caption
UCLA

Some critically ill patients who received a CAR-T cell treatment have remained cancer-free for as long as five years, researchers say. But the price is high. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images

A new study finds certain drugs that can boost the immune system show promise for developing anti-aging treatments in the future. David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

toggle caption
David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Experimental Drugs Boost Elderly Immune Systems, Raising Hopes For Anti-Aging Effects

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/627875888/628138025" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Our health care systems need to adjust a little to try to get knowledge about cancer prevention to everybody," says Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. American Cancer Society hide caption

toggle caption
American Cancer Society

Lipitor, a best-seller as a cholesterol treatment, is being tested as a remedy for the flu. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mel Evans/AP

Scientists Find New Tricks For Old Drugs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/625688126/627417605" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"If my life were to end next week ... I want to feel like I have made a contribution," said Carol Martin, seen here holding her 2018 Boston Marathon medal. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Poliovirus, long a scourge, has been modified by Duke University researchers for experimental use as a brain cancer treatment. Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Gaertner/Science Source