Treatments : Shots - Health News Here you can find out how the practice of medicine is changing. We pull together the latest research on medical tests, drugs and other therapies.

A coalition of mental health advocacy groups is calling on federal regulators, state agencies and employers to conduct random audits of insurers to make sure they are in compliance with the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

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Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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Christina Arenas reviews her medical bills at home in Washington, D.C. She complained about a mammogram and ultrasounds that she felt were unnecessary and sought a refund. Allison Shelley hide caption

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Allison Shelley

Epidemic Of Health Care Waste: From $1,877 Ear Piercing To ICU Overuse

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Lauren Kafka rented a machine that delivered cold water and compression to manage pain after rotator cuff surgery. Her insurance company said it wasn't medically necessary and refused to pay for it. Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka
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Telemedicine For Addiction Treatment? Picture Remains Fuzzy

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Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or from a bone spur that can rub against a tendon. Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Popular Surgery To Ease Chronic Shoulder Pain Called Into Question

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Greg Miller shows the Suboxone medication in 2016 that he has taken daily for his addiction to painkillers. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Researchers grew sheets of genetically altered skin cells in the lab and used them to treat a boy with life-threatening epidermolysis bullosa. CMR Unimore/Nature hide caption

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CMR Unimore/Nature

Genetically Altered Skin Saves A Boy Dying Of A Rare Disease

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Patients with Type-1 diabetes don't have enough healthy islets of Langerhans cells — hormone-secreting cells of the pancreas. Granules inside these cells release insulin and other substances into the blood. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

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Kolbi Brown (left), a program manager at Harlem Hospital in New York, helps Karen Phillips sign up to receive more information about the All of Us medical research program, during a block party outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Troubling History In Medical Research Still Fresh For Black Americans

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Researchers injected dye into this human neuron to reveal its shape. Allen Institute hide caption

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Allen Institute

Scientists And Surgeons Team Up To Create Virtual Human Brain Cells

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Want to get smarter? Brain training games don't seem to help with that. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

In Memory Training Smackdown, One Method Dominates

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Kathi Kolb, a Rhode Island physical therapist, says she's frustrated that fewer than half of eligible breast cancer patients receive a shorter course of radiation, even though studies proved it was safe nearly 10 years ago. Katye Martens Brier for KHN hide caption

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Katye Martens Brier for KHN

Pricking your fingers may someday be a thing of the past for diabetics as new technologies aim to make blood sugar regulation more convenient. Alden Chadwick/Getty Images hide caption

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Alden Chadwick/Getty Images

Hundreds of homes in the Coffey Park neighborhood that were destroyed by the Tubbs Fire on October 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As She Evacuated Patients From The Hospital, Her Home Burned

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