Treatments : Shots - Health News Here you can find out how the practice of medicine is changing. We pull together the latest research on medical tests, drugs and other therapies.

A 291-day-old retina. Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process, which could help accelerate efforts to cure colorblindness and lead to new treatments for diseases. Johns Hopkins University hide caption

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Johns Hopkins University

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision

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Randy and Karen O'Burke together at their son's home in Hendersonville, Tenn., last week. "Apparently, I'm pretty much of a miracle," Randy says. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU

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Richard Langford, at home in East Nashville, Tenn., still has significant trouble with mental focus and memory issues 10 years after a sudden and serious infection landed him in the hospital ICU for several weeks. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

When ICU Delirium Leads To Symptoms Of Dementia After Discharge

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Delayed pushing made no difference in whether first-time mothers had a cesarean section, a large study finds. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

When Giving Birth For The First Time, Push Away

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Some apps, like CBT-I Coach, use proven scientific methods to help people manage their underlying sleep challenges. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Some Apps May Help Curb Insomnia, Others Just Put You To Sleep

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Suboxone, a medicine to treat opioid addiction, helps people struggling with substance abuse by blocking their cravings and physical withdrawal symptoms. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone

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Psychologists find that cognitive processing therapy — a type of counseling that helps people learn to challenge and modify their beliefs related to a trauma — can be useful in healing the mental health problems some experience after a sexual assault. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Osteoporosis specialists are considering wider use of a drug to strengthen bones in elderly women. BSIP/BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Wider Use Of Osteoporosis Drug Could Prevent Bone Fractures In More Elderly Women

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Dr. James P. Allison, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, poses for a photo in New York in 2015. Allison and Tasuku Honjo have jointly been awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Scientists Who Sparked Revolution In Cancer Treatment Share Nobel Prize In Medicine

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For severe heart failure patients, an LVAD, or left ventricular-assist device, helps the heart pump blood. 7asmin via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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7asmin via Wikimedia Commons

Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

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The fix was in for this rhesus macaque drinking juice on the Ganges River in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India. No gambling was required to get the reward. Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM hide caption

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Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area

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A Swiss study tracking the health of a group of children conceived via assisted reproductive technology found that a surprising number developed premature aging of their blood vessels. Now in their teens, 15 percent have hypertension. Steve Debenport/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Debenport/Getty Images

Megan Baker (left) of Papa & Barkley Co., a Cannabis company based in Eureka, Calif., shows Shirley Avedon of Laguna Woods different products intended to help with pain relief. Stephanie O'Neill for NPR hide caption

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Stephanie O'Neill for NPR

Ticket To Ride: Pot Sellers Put Seniors On The Canna-Bus

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Aaron Reid, 20, rests in an exam room in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

Update: A Young Man's Experiment With A 'Living Drug' For Leukemia

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Barb Williamson runs several sobriety houses in Pennsylvania, commercially run homes where residents support each other in their recovery from opioid addiction. Initially, she says, she saw the use of Suboxone or methadone by residents as "a crutch," and banned them. But evidence the medicines can be helpful changed her mind. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Many 'Recovery Houses' Won't Let Residents Use Medicine To Quit Opioids

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Baby boomers who use marijuana seem to be using it more often than in previous years, a recent survey finds — 5.7 percent of respondents ages 50 to 64 said they'd tried it in the past month. The drug is also gaining popularity among people in their 70s and 80s. Manonallard/Getty Images hide caption

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Manonallard/Getty Images

Scientists at Johns Hopkins University are studying barn owls to understand how the brain maintains focus. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Scientists Study Barn Owls To Understand Why People With ADHD Struggle To Focus

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