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Treatments

Researchers have identified waves of proteins in blood that peak at three distinct stages of life. What do the findings mean for aging? ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

Scientists Find Surprising Age-Related Protein Waves In Blood

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Dr. BJ Miller's new project, the Center for Dying and Living, is a website designed for people to share their stories related to living with illness, disability or loss, or their stories of caring for someone with those conditions. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

After A Freak Accident, A Doctor Finds Insight Into 'Living Life And Facing Death'

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR and KHN

When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help

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Matthew Braun, a first-year medical student at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Wash., says his personal history with opioids will help him care for patients. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Medical Students Say Their Opioid Experiences Will Shape How They Prescribe

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Geriatric oncologist Supriya Gupta Mohile meets with patient Jim Mulcahy at Highland Hospital in Rochester, N.Y. "If I didn't do a geriatric assessment and just looked at a patient I wouldn't have the same information," she says. Mike Bradley for NPR hide caption

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Mike Bradley for NPR

An infant is monitored for opioid withdrawal in a neonatal intensive care unit at the CAMC Women and Children's Hospital in Charleston, W.Va., in June. Infants exposed to opioids in utero often experience symptoms of withdrawal. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In The Fight For Money For The Opioid Crisis, Will The Youngest Victims Be Left Out?

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As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease

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Susanna M. Hamilton/Broad Communications

Molecular Scissors Could Help Keep Some Viral Illnesses At Bay

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Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria — rod-shaped bacteria in this tinted, scanning electron microscope image — are found in soil, water and as normal flora in the human intestine. But they can cause serious wound, lung, skin and urinary tract infections, and many pseudomonas strains are drug-resistant. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

How Best To Use The Few New Drugs To Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Germs?

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Brelahn Wyatt, a Navy ensign and second-year medical student, shares a hug with Shetland. The dog's military commission does not entitle him to salutes. Julie Rovner/KHN hide caption

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Julie Rovner/KHN

Melinda McDowell sought treatment for her addiction to meth. She started taking the medication naltrexone and has been sober for more than a year now. Andrea Dukakis/CPR News hide caption

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Andrea Dukakis/CPR News

A Medication To Treat Meth Addiction? Some Take A New Look At Naltrexone

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The preliminary results described Wednesday come from two patients with multiple myeloma and one with sarcoma. This was just a first safety test, the scientists say, and was not designed to measure whether such a treatment would work. Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test

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During deep sleep, waves of cerebrospinal fluid (blue) coincide with temporary decreases in blood flow (red). Less blood in the brain means more room for the fluid to carry away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. Fultz et al. 2019 hide caption

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Fultz et al. 2019

How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins

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Sarah Zuger, who has Type 1 diabetes, with her children, Elsie and Liam, at their home in Munhall, Pa. Liam tested positive for antibodies that indicate high risk for developing Type 1 diabetes. Ross Mantle for NPR hide caption

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Ross Mantle for NPR

Kevin Wilson's previous books include The Family Fang, Perfect Little World and Baby, You're Gonna Be Mine. Leigh Anne Couch/Ecco hide caption

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Leigh Anne Couch/Ecco

For Author Kevin Wilson, Writing Offers A Brief Reprieve From Tourette's

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Nathaly Sweeney, a neonatologist at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego and researcher with Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine, attends to a young patient in the hospital's neonatal intensive care unit. Jenny Siegwart/Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine hide caption

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Jenny Siegwart/Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine

Fast DNA Sequencing Can Offer Diagnostic Clues When Newborns Need Intensive Care

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At Chicago's McCormick Place, neuroscientists from around the world presented their work to colleagues. But some researchers were denied entry because of the Trump administration's travel ban. Rob Piercy/Allen Institute hide caption

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Rob Piercy/Allen Institute

U.S. Travel Ban Disrupts The World's Largest Brain Science Meeting

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