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There has been a backlash since Chinese scientist He Jiankui's claim that he edited genes in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies

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In experiments involving people with epilepsy, targeted zaps of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex region of the brain helped ease depressive symptoms. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes

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American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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Researcher He Jiankui spoke Wednesday during the 2nd International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies

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Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. Critics say the experiment was premature. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR

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Four-year-old Violet (right) supervises as her mom Margaret Siebers pours a first-ever spoonful of honey for 1-year-old Frances to try. Siebers spent much of the end of her pregnancy with Frances confined to bed rest at her home in Milwaukee. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

Rethinking Bed Rest For Pregnancy

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Dr. Ruth Levesque (right) hands Shaun McDougall his newborn son Brady at South Shore Hospital in Weymouth, Mass. The birth of the second twin, Bryce, was much trickier than Brady's. Good communication between the health team and parents was crucial to safely avoiding a C-section, obstetricians say. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Twin's Difficult Birth Put A Project Designed To Reduce C-Sections To The Test

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Nicole and Ben Veum, with their little boy, Adrian. Nicole was in recovery from opioid addiction when she gave birth to Adrian, and she worried the fentanyl in her epidural would lead to relapse, but it didn't. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

Childbirth In The Age Of Addiction: New Mom Worries About Maintaining Her Sobriety

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Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

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A change in hospital culture can help prevent serious complications and death during delivery, according to clinicians who work in the field. Ian Hoot/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Hoot/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

How does the brain's working memory actually work? Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

We Just 'Fell Back' An Hour. Here Are Tips To Stay Healthy During Dark Days Ahead

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Cancer of the cervix is one of the most common cancers affecting women and can be fatal. Here, cervical cancer cells are dividing, as seen through a colored scanning electron micrograph. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival

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Evelyn Marie Vukadinovich is swabbed with a gauze pad immediately after being born by cesarean section at Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Doctors Test Bacterial Smear After Cesarean Sections To Bolster Babies' Microbiomes

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