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Treatments

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New clues to the biology of long COVID are starting to emerge

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Amyloid plaques are characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease. The new drug Aduhelm is able to remove this sticky substance that builds up in the brains of patients with the disease, but many doctors are still skeptical of how well it really works. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra via Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra via Getty Images

Cost and controversy are limiting use of new Alzheimer's drug

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A hormone-blocking drug implant was prescribed for an active 8-year-old girl diagnosed with central precocious puberty. The price of one option was thousands of dollars less than the other. Kristina Barker for KHN hide caption

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Kristina Barker for KHN

Drugmaker drops cheaper version of drug, leaving patients stuck with pricier one

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Researchers are studying athletes and military personnel to learn more about how a concussion can affect the brain's ability to understand sound. Callista Images/Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Callista Images/Image Source/Getty Images

After a concussion, the brain may no longer make sense of sounds

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A box and container of ivermectin arranged in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Americans against taking ivermectin, an anti-parasitic drug, as treatment or prevention against Covid-19. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Ari Blank got a comforting hand-squeeze from his mom in May as he was vaccinated against COVID-19 in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. This week, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the use of Pfizer's vaccine in even younger kids — ages 5 to 11. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

A nurse draw a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine dose from a vial at the Cameron Grove Community Center in Bowie, Md., in late March. Moderna says study data supports use of a half-dose of the vaccine in children 6 to 11. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Pharmacist LaChandra McGowan prepares a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic operated by DePaul Community Health in New Orleans in August. Soon, children ages 5 to 11 could be eligible for Pfizer shots. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A health care worker prepares a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during a clinic held at the Watts Juneteenth Street Fair in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Nurse Christina Garibay administers Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine to a man at a community outreach event in Los Angeles in August. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Janet Gerber, a health department worker in Louisville, Ky., processes boxes containing vials of the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine in March. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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Surgeons remove the liver and kidneys of a deceased donor, for later transplantation. Owen Franken/Getty Images hide caption

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Owen Franken/Getty Images

In the quest for a liver transplant, patients are segregated by prior alcohol use

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Scientists at the Allen Institute for Brain Science uncovered differences among human brain cells (left) those of the marmoset monkey (middle) and mouse in a brain region that controls movement, the primary motor cortex. Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Brain Science

New brain maps could help the search for Alzheimer's treatments

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At the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, staff members Tyrone Clifford (left) and Rick Andrews (right) demonstrate how a contingency management visit typically begins, with a participant picking up a specimen cup for a urine sample. If the sample tests negative for meth or cocaine use, the participant has an incentive dollar amount added to their "bank" which can later be traded for a gift card. Christopher Artalejo-Price/San Francisco AIDS Foundation hide caption

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Christopher Artalejo-Price/San Francisco AIDS Foundation

To Combat Meth, California Will Try A Bold Treatment: Pay Drug Users To Stop Using

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Carlene Knight, who has a congenital eye disorder, volunteered to let doctors edit the genes in her retina using CRISPR. Franny White/OHSU hide caption

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Franny White/OHSU

A Gene-Editing Experiment Let These Patients With Vision Loss See Color Again

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A supporter of pop star Britney Spears participating in a #FreeBritney rally on July 14 in Washington, D.C. When anyone poses a high risk of harm to themselves or others, psychiatrists are obligated to hospitalize them, even against their will. For many patients, paying for that involuntary care leads to long-term financial strain. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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People opposed to COVID-19 vaccines often embrace ivermectin, a drug they think is not getting the attention it deserves. Here, an anti-vaccination protester takes part in a rally against vaccine mandates last month in Santa Monica, Calif. Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images

Various types of pufferfish are among those served as the gastronomic delicacy fugu. The paralyzing nerve toxin some of these fish contain is also under study by brain scientists hunting new ways to treat amblyopia. shan.shihan/Getty Images hide caption

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shan.shihan/Getty Images

Pufferfish Toxin Holds Clues To Treating 'Lazy Eye' In Adults

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Getting vaccinated during pregnancy is one of the best ways to make sure your vulnerable newborn benefits from your antibodies to the coronavirus, doctors say. ©fitopardo/Getty Images hide caption

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©fitopardo/Getty Images

Babies, The Delta Variant And COVID: What Parents Need To Know

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