Treatments : Shots - Health News Here you can find out how the practice of medicine is changing. We pull together the latest research on medical tests, drugs and other therapies.
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Treatments

Winston Hall, 9, needs growth hormone to manage symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic condition. A shortage of the medicine has contributed to behavioral issues that led him to be sent home from school. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

Persistent shortage of growth hormone frustrates parents and clinicians

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After using the Lenire device for an hour each day for 12 weeks, Victoria Banks says her tinnitus is "barely noticeable." David Petrelli/Victoria Banks hide caption

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David Petrelli/Victoria Banks

Got tinnitus? A device that tickles the tongue helps this musician find relief

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Surgeon Christoph Haller and his research team from Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children are working on technology that could someday result in an artificial womb to help extremely premature babies. Chloe Ellingson for NPR hide caption

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Chloe Ellingson for NPR

An artificial womb could build a bridge to health for premature babies

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Denise Lee on her last day of chemo. In addition to chemo and surgery, she was treated with immunotherapy. She's currently in remission. Denise Lee hide caption

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Denise Lee

After 40 years of smoking, she survived lung cancer thanks to new treatments

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Surgeons perform the first transplant of a genetically modified pig kidney into a living human at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Michelle Rose/Massachusetts General Hospital hide caption

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Michelle Rose/Massachusetts General Hospital

First human transplant of a genetically modified pig kidney performed

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Pfizer's Paxlovid combines two antiviral drugs to fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In a pandemic milestone, the NIH ends guidance on COVID treatment

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A young, genetically modified pig raised at a Revivicor farm for organ transplantation research. Scott P. Yates for NPR hide caption

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Scott P. Yates for NPR

How genetically modified pigs could end the shortage of organs for transplants

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A case of bronchitis in 2014 left Sanna Stella, a therapist who lives in the Chicago area, with debilitating fatigue. Stacey Wescott/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Stacey Wescott/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Clues to a better understanding of chronic fatigue syndrome emerge from a major study

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An experimental gene therapy tested in young children with an inherited form of deafness restored some hearing for most of them. VICTOR HABBICK VISIONS/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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VICTOR HABBICK VISIONS/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Gene therapy shows promise for an inherited form of deafness

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Newer blood tests can help doctors diagnose Alzheimer's disease without a brain scan or spinal tap. But some tests are more accurate than others. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Blood tests can help diagnose Alzheimer's — if they're accurate enough. Not all are

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For patients with long COVID, exercise can lead to a worsening of symptoms, a condition called post-exertional malaise. New research shows what's going on in their muscles. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

A discovery in the muscles of long COVID patients may explain exercise troubles

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Every year, an estimated 100,000 young adults or adolescents in the U.S. experience a psychotic episode. Only 10-20% of them gain access to the holistic treatment approach recommended by the National Institute of Mental Health as the gold standard of care for early psychosis, due to lack of space or because insurance won't cover it. Illustration by Anna Vignet/KQED hide caption

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Illustration by Anna Vignet/KQED

It keeps people with schizophrenia in school and on the job. Why won't insurance pay?

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Doctors and medical societies are suggesting patients who rely on Flovent take action now to ensure they can get the medication in 2024. Mariia Siurtukova/Getty Images hide caption

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Mariia Siurtukova/Getty Images

A popular asthma inhaler is leaving pharmacy shelves. Here's what you need to know

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A research participant in the Levi Lab at University California, Berkeley undergoes treatment for amblyopia using virtual reality. Elena Zhukova/UC Regents hide caption

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Elena Zhukova/UC Regents

Virtual reality gives a boost to the 'lazy eye'

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"The therapy has really transformed my life more than I could have ever imagined," Victoria Gray, the first person to receive the CRISPR gene-editing treatment tellls NPR. "It gave me a new lease on life." Orlando Gili for NPR hide caption

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Orlando Gili for NPR

Sickle cell patient's journey leads to landmark approval of gene-editing treatment

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The antibiotic doxycycline hyclate can be used after sex to prevent sexually transmitted infections. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

There's an effective morning-after pill for STIs but it's not clear it works in women

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Diana and Paul Zucknick have tried repeatedly and unsuccessfully to have children. The Austin, Texas, couple are intrigued by scientific research that may someday make it possible to create eggs and sperm from their skin cells. Montinique Monroe for NPR hide caption

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Montinique Monroe for NPR

Infertile people, gay and trans couples yearn for progress on lab-made eggs and sperm

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"I'm ecstatic. It's a blessing that they approved this therapy," said Victoria Gray, the first person in the U.S. to undergo CRISPR gene-editing for sickle cell, of the Food and Drug Administration's decision. Orlando Gili hide caption

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Orlando Gili

FDA approves first gene-editing treatment for human illness

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An artistic rendering of deep brain stimulation. Scientists are studying this approach to see if it can treat cognitive impairment that can arise after a traumatic brain injury and other conditions. Andrew Janson / Butson Lab, University of Utah/NIH Image Gallery hide caption

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Andrew Janson / Butson Lab, University of Utah/NIH Image Gallery

A little electric stimulation in just the right spot may bolster a damaged brain

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