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Treatments

The director of the Denver campaign told NPR that the results from the vote shows that society's perception of psychedelics has changed. Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway (left), now 17, with her mother Joanne Carnell-Holdaway. Isabelle has a dangerous infection that is being treated with a cocktail of genetically modified viruses. Courtesy of Jo Holdaway hide caption

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Courtesy of Jo Holdaway

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

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A growing body of research suggests psychedelic mushrooms may have therapeutic benefits for certain conditions. Now a movement seeks to decriminalize them. farmer images/Getty Images hide caption

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farmer images/Getty Images

A Growing Push To Loosen Laws Around Psilocybin, Treat Mushrooms As Medicine

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Dr. Brian Chesebro (right), in Portland, Ore., has calculated that by simply using the anesthesia gas sevoflurane in most surgeries, instead of the similar gas desflurane, he can significantly cut the amount of global warming each procedure contributes to the environment. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Effects Of Surgery On A Warming Planet: Can Anesthesia Go Green?

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Even if a genetic test could reliably predict obesity risk, would people make effective use of the information? eyecrave/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

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eyecrave/Vetta/Getty Images

How Helpful Would A Genetic Test For Obesity Risk Be?

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Phil Gutis with his dog, Abe, who died last year. Gutis, who has Alzheimer's, hoped an experimental drug could help preserve his memories. Courtesy of Timothy Weaver hide caption

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Courtesy of Timothy Weaver

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

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As scientists learn more about the complex way genes combine and work together to create human traits, the idea of "designer babies" becomes less and less likely. BlackJack3D/Getty Images hide caption

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BlackJack3D/Getty Images

Why Making A 'Designer Baby' Would Be Easier Said Than Done

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Psychiatry's shift toward seeing mental health problems as an illness to be treated with a pill hasn't always served patients well, says Harvard historian and author Anne Harrington. James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images hide caption

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James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images

How Drug Companies Helped Shape A Shifting, Biological View Of Mental Illness

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Will computers alienate us from the healing touch? Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

As Artificial Intelligence Moves Into Medicine, The Human Touch Could Be A Casualty

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MMR — the modern combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella — provides stronger, longer-lasting protection against measles than the stand-alone measles vaccine typically given in the U.S. in the early 1960s. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too

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Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk

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The habit of ordering unneeded tests and treatments drives up medical costs. It's a pattern doctors often learn in medical school and residency. Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images hide caption

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Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images

David Vetter, pictured in September 1982 inside part of the bubble environment that was his protective home until he died in 1984. Today most kids born with severe combined immunodeficiency are successfully treated with bone marrow transplants, but researchers think gene therapy is the future. AP hide caption

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AP

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease

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Nurse practitioner Debra Brown guides patient Merdis Wells through a diabetic retinopathy exam at University Medical Center in New Orleans. Courtesy of IDx hide caption

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Courtesy of IDx

How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?

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Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

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The North American porcupine has a cute face, but it has upward of 30,000 menacing quills covering much of its body. The slow-moving herbivore uses them as a last-resort defense against predators. Lindsay Wildlife Experience hide caption

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Lindsay Wildlife Experience

The presence of the hepatitis C virus in donated hearts and organs for transplantation wasn't an impediment for a successful result for recipients. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images

Hepatitis C Not A Barrier For Organ Transplantation, Study Finds

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Amir Kiani (from left), Chloe O'Connell and Nishit Asnani troubleshoot an algorithm to diagnose tuberculosis in computer lab at Stanford University. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

How Can Doctors Be Sure A Self-Taught Computer Is Making The Right Diagnosis?

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Scientists are questioning the evidence about an alleged attack on diplomats at the U.S. Embassy in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Doubts Rise About Evidence That U.S. Diplomats In Cuba Were Attacked

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Shots - Health News

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