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This illustration made available by the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health depicts cells in an Alzheimer's-affected brain. An experimental drug modestly slowed the brain disease's progression, researchers reported Tuesday. NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP hide caption

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP
Simon & Schuster

A cell biologist shares the wonder of researching life's most fundamental form

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Antonio Rapuano got an infusion of a monoclonal antibody to treat his COVID in Albano, Italy in 2021. Such infusions have been effective treatments for COVID during the pandemic, but doctors are now finding that most monoclonal antibodies no longer work against new variants of SARS-CoV-2. Yara Nardi/Reuters hide caption

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Yara Nardi/Reuters

How monoclonal antibodies lost the fight with new COVID variants

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A doctor points to PET scan results that are part of Alzheimer's disease research. Much work in the field focuses a substance called beta-amyloid. A new study could test whether that's the right target. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What causes Alzheimer's? Study puts leading theory to 'ultimate test'

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After a dose of ketamine, special video games that offered a depressed player positive feedback, in the form of smiling faces or encouraging words, seemed to boost the length of time the drug quelled depression. akinbostanci/Getty Images hide caption

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akinbostanci/Getty Images

Smiling faces might help the drug ketamine keep depression at bay

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A new European study grabbed headlines this week, as it seemed to question the efficacy of colonoscopies as a cancer screening tool. But U.S. physicians say there were big limits to that study. They cite more than a decade of research showing colonoscopies save lives. lechatnoir/Getty Images hide caption

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lechatnoir/Getty Images

Colonoscopies save lives. Doctors push back against European study that casts doubt

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This cross-section of a rat brain shows tissue from a human brain organoid fluorescing in light green. Scientists say these implanted clusters of human neurons could aid the study of brain disorders. Pasca lab / Stanford Medicine hide caption

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Pasca lab / Stanford Medicine

Human cells in a rat's brain could shed light on autism and ADHD

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A color-enhanced scan of an ectopic pregnancy, which develops outside the uterus — often inside a fallopian tube. Such pregnancies are never viable and, unless ended, can lead to rupture of the tube, severe bleeding and even death. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

Even though the sisters hope a successful drug treatment for their family's form of dementia will emerge, they're now planning for a future without one. "There's a kind of sorrow about Alzheimer's disease that, as strange as it seems, there's a comfort in being in the presence of people who understand it," Ward says. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

With early Alzheimer's in the family, these sisters decided to test for the gene

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Kyle Planck, who has recovered from a painful case of monkeypox, has joined advocacy groups and pleaded with elected officials to make the antiviral pills TPOXX more available. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

Getting monkeypox treatment is easier, but still daunting and confusing

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In states that outlaw abortion, some patients and health care workers worry that in vitro fertilization could be in legal jeopardy too. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Why this key chance to getting permanent birth control is often missed

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A pulse oximeter is worn by Brown University professor Kimani Toussaint. The devices have been shown in research to produce inaccurate results in dark-skinned people, and Toussaint's lab is developing technology that would be more accurate, regardless of skin tone. Craig LeMoult hide caption

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Craig LeMoult

When it comes to darker skin, pulse oximeters fall short

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