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People and cars line up outside Boston Medical Center near the emergency room, where COVID-19 testing was taking place, on Jan. 3. Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Victoria Gray, who has sickle cell disease, volunteered for one of the most anticipated medical experiments in decades: the first attempt to use the gene-editing technique CRISPR to treat a genetic disorder in the United States. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

First sickle cell patient treated with CRISPR gene-editing still thriving

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Thomas Hansmann/Pfizer

The COVID antiviral drugs are here but they're scarce. Here's what to know

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Maryland National Guard Spc. James Truong administers a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine on May 21 in Wheaton, Maryland. People vaccinated with the Moderna vaccine likely need a booster to keep up their protection against the new omicron variant of the coronavirus. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Omicron evades Moderna vaccine too, study suggests, but boosters help

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At-home rapid COVID-19 tests, like this one from Abbott, can be difficult to find and cost-prohibitive for some families. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Why rapid COVID tests are in short supply in the U.S.

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People line up outside a free COVID-19 vaccination site that opened Friday in Washington, D.C. The local health department is stepping up vaccination and booster shots as more cases of the omicron variant are being identified in the United States. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Dr. Naresh Aggarwal talks with Jennifer Bain, who volunteered for a study of Medicago's COVID-19 vaccine, in Toronto. More than 24,000 volunteers in six countries participated. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images

A COVID vaccine grown in plants measures up

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Scientists at Pfizer's research and development laboratories in Groton, Conn., worked on the COVID-19 pill called Paxlovid. Stew Milne/AP hide caption

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Stew Milne/AP

How Pfizer developed a COVID pill in record time

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Researchers at the University of Washington Medicine Retrovirology Lab at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle process samples from Novavax's phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial in February 2021. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Ducey/Getty Images

A different kind of COVID vaccine is about ready to roll

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Keidy Ventura, 17, receives her first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in West New York, N.J. Pfizer has asked federal regulators to expand the eligibility for booster shots to include 16- and 17-year-olds. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A COVID-19 antiviral pill called molnupiravir from Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics is being considered by the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use in the coronavirus pandemic. Merck & Co Inc./Handout via Reuters hide caption

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Merck & Co Inc./Handout via Reuters

Molnupiravir, an antiviral drug to treat mild to moderate COVID-19, is under consideration by the FDA for possible authorization. Merck hide caption

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Merck

New antiviral drugs are coming for COVID. Here's what you need to know

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Danyelle Clark-Gutierrez and her service dog, Lisa, shop for food at a grocery store. Clark-Gutierrez got the yellow Labrador retriever to help her cope with post-traumatic stress disorder after she experienced military sexual trauma while serving in the Air Force. Stephanie O'Neill for KHN hide caption

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Stephanie O'Neill for KHN

More veterans with PTSD will soon get help from service dogs. Thank the 'PAWS' Act

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Eugene Mymrin/Getty Images

New clues to the biology of long COVID are starting to emerge

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