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Shots - Health News

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Treatments

Eli Lilly researchers prepare cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies in a laboratory in Indianapolis. The drugmaker has asked the U.S. government to allow emergency use of its experimental antibody therapy. David Morrison/AP hide caption

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David Morrison/AP

How Will The Limited Supply Of Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Be Allocated?

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COVID-19 mortality rates are going down, according to studies of two large hospital systems, partly thanks to improvements in treatment. Here, clinicians care for a patient in July at an El Centro, Calif., hospital. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Studies Point To Big Drop In COVID-19 Death Rates

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Recruiting patients for medical studies has been challenging during the pandemic, especially older people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

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A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic

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Tobacco plants are being used in the development of COVID-19 vaccines. One is already being tested in humans. Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Tobacco Plants Contribute Key Ingredient For COVID-19 Vaccine

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The nasal spray version of the flu vaccine contains live but weakened form of the virus. Researchers think there's a good chance this could help boost the body's immunity and improve its ability to fight off pathogens such as the coronavirus. Tim Sloan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Sloan/AFP via Getty Images

A new wave of rapid coronavirus tests has entered the market with the potential to greatly expand screening for the virus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Can The U.S. Use Its Growing Supply Of Rapid Tests To Stop The Virus?

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African Americans and other underrepresented minorities make up only about 5% of the people in genetics research studies. janiecbros/Getty Images hide caption

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Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It

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Researchers in Miami hold syringes containing either a placebo or the candidate COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna. Their work is part of a phase three clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Taimy Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Taimy Alvarez/AP

Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

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English coronavirus patients George Gilbert, 85, and his wife, Domneva Gilbert, 84, were part of a clinical trial that included Eli Lilly & Co.'s baricitinib. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Experimental Medicines For COVID-19 Could Help Someday, But Home Runs Not Guaranteed

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About 1 In 5 Households In U.S. Cities Miss Needed Medical Care During Pandemic

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Scientists used light to control the firing of specific cells to artificially create a rhythm in the brain that acted like the drug ketamine enjoynz/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

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As COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Move At Warp Speed, Recruiting Black Volunteers Takes Time

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. A drug to achieve the same effect was recently tested in space. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Drug That Bulked Up Mice In Space Might Someday Help Astronauts Make Long Voyages

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A recent survey found 62% of people in the U.S. with anorexia experienced a worsening of symptoms after the pandemic hit. And nearly a third of Americans with binge-eating disorder, which is far more common, reported an increase in episodes. Boogich/Getty Images hide caption

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Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat

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A scientist at work on a COVID-19 vaccine candidate at Bogazici University in Istanbul in August. Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

How Can You Tell If A COVID-19 Vaccine Is Working?

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Studies of steroids, including the generic drug dexamethasone, have found that these drugs can reduce deaths in patients hospitalized with serious cases of COVID-19. Photo Illustration by Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Inexpensive Steroids Can Save Lives Of Seriously Ill COVID-19 Patients

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Patients with a fast-progressing form of ALS who got daily doses of an experimental two-drug combination called AMX0035 scored higher on a standard measure of function than patients who didn't get the drug. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

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Zephyr/Science Source

Drug Combination Slows Progression Of ALS And Could Mark 'New Era' In Treatment

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Virtual medical appointments are more common since the coronavirus pandemic began. But without physical exams, doctors may miss certain diagnoses and miss out on building relationships with patients. filadendron/Getty Images hide caption

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Several influenza vaccines have been made in the form of a nasal spray, instead of an injection. The sprays confer two kinds of immunity to the recipient but can be difficult technologically to make. Tim Sloan /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Sloan /AFP via Getty Images

What A Nasal Spray Vaccine Against COVID-19 Might Do Even Better Than A Shot

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FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn (left), Vice President Mike Pence, and Dr. Ella Grach, CEO of Wake Research, at the NC Biotechnology Center in July, where Phase 3 trials for a coronavirus vaccine candidate are underway. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

COVID-19 Vaccine May Pit Science Against Politics

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