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Shots - Health News

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Treatments

After finishing up some household chores, Brody Knapp gets a chance to play with his mother, Ashley, at their home in Kansas City, Mo. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First

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Lori Pinkley of Kansas City, Mo., has struggled with chronic pain since she was a teenager. She has found relief from low doses of naltrexone, a drug that at higher doses is used to treat addiction. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

In Tiny Doses, An Addiction Medication Moonlights As A Treatment For Chronic Pain

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Palforzia, a new drug to treat peanut allergies, is expected to get FDA approval. The main ingredient of the drug is peanut flour. Marco Livolsi/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Livolsi/EyeEm/Getty Images

Cameron and Katlynn Fischer celebrated their April wedding in Colorado. But the day before, Cameron was in such bad shape from a bachelor party hangover that he headed to an emergency room to be rehydrated. That's when their financial headaches began. Courtesy of Cameron Fischer hide caption

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Courtesy of Cameron Fischer

A colored computerized tomography (CT) scan of an axial section of the brain of a 59-year-old patient with a malignant (cancerous) glioblastoma brain tumor. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

Deadly Brain Cancers Act Like 'Vampires' By Hijacking Normal Cells To Grow

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Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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An FDA committee voted to approve Palforzia, a new treatment for peanut allergy. The treatment is a form of oral immunotherapy intended to desensitize the immune system to peanuts. Lauri Patterson/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauri Patterson/Getty Images

These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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Tracy Lee for NPR

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

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Dr. Abdul Subhan, a psychiatrist, at Meridian Health Services in Indiana, connects with patients over the Internet. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Telepsychiatry Helps Recruitment And Patient Care In Rural Areas

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Joe Bay (center), coach of a New York City "Bootcamp for New Dads," instructs Adewale Oshodi (left) and George Pasco in how to cradle an infant for best soothing. Jason LeCras for NPR hide caption

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Jason LeCras for NPR

Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences hide caption

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Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

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A man cools off in a fountain in New York's Washington Square Park this summer. Death from all causes doubled during a heat wave in New York City in August 1975, with heart attacks and strokes accounting for a majority of the excess deaths. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gianpiero Palermo, a professor of embryology at Weill Cornell Medicine, runs the lab where scientists are trying to use CRISPR to edit genes in human sperm. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR

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Naked mole rats are eusocial, which means they live all crowded together, in a colony underground. Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source

Astrocyte cells like these from the brain of a mouse may differ subtly from those in a human brain. David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People

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Mifepristone is a medication used to end early pregnancies and to relieve the symptoms of miscarriage. It's heavily restricted by the FDA. Adria Malcolm hide caption

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Adria Malcolm

Though not the same as actually jumping into the waves, a virtual reality program like this one that let a headset-wearing patient "swim with dolphins" was enough of an immersive distraction to significantly reduce pain, a study found. Courtesy of Cedars Sinai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Courtesy of Cedars Sinai/Screenshot by NPR

Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away

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Mahmee CEO Melissa Hanna (right) and her mother, Linda Hanna (left), co-founded the company in 2014. Linda's more than 40 years of clinical experience as a registered nurse and certified lactation consultant helped them understand the need, they say. Keith Alcantara/Mahmee hide caption

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Keith Alcantara/Mahmee

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

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A Harvard research team's prototype of a portable exosuit is made of cloth components worn at the waist and thighs. A computer that's built into the shorts uses an algorithm that can sense when the user shifts between a walking gait and a running gait. Wyss Institute at Harvard University hide caption

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Wyss Institute at Harvard University

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail

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Timely support and treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can help children focus and thrive, pediatricians say. But it takes close follow-up after diagnosis to tailor that treatment and avoid drug side effects. Weeraya Siankulpatanakij/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Weeraya Siankulpatanakij/EyeEm/Getty Images

Most Kids On Medicaid Who Are Prescribed ADHD Drugs Don't Get Proper Follow-Up

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