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Treatments

A vial of the experimental Novavax coronavirus vaccine is ready for use in a London study in 2020. Novavax's vaccine candidate contains a noninfectious bit of the virus — the spike protein — with a substance called an adjuvant added that helps the body generate a strong immune response. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

A New Type Of COVID-19 Vaccine Could Debut Soon

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Dr. William Burke reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix in 2018. An experimental Alzheimer's drug from Biogen and Eisai is on the verge of a Food and Drug Administration decision. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Poised For Decision On Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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Mark Prausnitz, Georgia Tech Regents' professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, holds a vaccine patch containing microneedles that dissolve into the skin. Christopher Moore/Georgia Tech hide caption

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Christopher Moore/Georgia Tech

A Vaccine Patch Could Someday Be An Ouchless Option

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New guidance would ease restrictions on researching embryos in the lab. BSIP/Science Source hide caption

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BSIP/Science Source

Controversial New Guidelines Would Allow Experiments On More Mature Human Embryos

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Jennifer Minhas had been a nurse for years when she contracted COVID-19 in 2020. Since then, lingering symptoms — what's known as long-haul COVID-19 — made it impossible for her to work. For months, she and her doctors struggled to understand what was behind her fatigue and rapid heartbeat, among other symptoms. Tara Pixley for NPR hide caption

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Tara Pixley for NPR

President Barack Obama bumped fists with Nathan Copeland during a tour of innovation projects at the White House Frontiers Conference at the University of Pittsburgh in 2016. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Scientists Bring The Sense Of Touch To A Robotic Arm

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This microscope image from the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research shows human colon cancer cells with the nuclei stained red. Americans should start getting screened for colon cancer at age 45, according to new guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. AP hide caption

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AP
Ada daSilva/Getty Images

Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says

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A man who is paralyzed was able to type with 95% accuracy by imagining that he was handwriting letters on a sheet of paper, a team reported in the journal Nature. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Man Who Is Paralyzed Communicates By Imagining Handwriting

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Carlene Knight, 54, is one of the first patients in a landmark study designed to try to restore vision in those who have a rare genetic disease that causes blindness. Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

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Even after full vaccination against COVID-19, people who have had organ transplants are urged by their doctors to keep wearing masks and taking extra precautions. Research shows the strong drugs they must take to prevent organ rejection can significantly blunt their body's response to the vaccine. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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DigiPub/Getty Images

Vaccination Against COVID 'Does Not Mean Immunity' For People With Organ Transplants

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Mixing different kinds of COVID-19 vaccines might help boost immune responses, but the idea has been slow to catch on. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Giving 2 Doses Of Different COVID-19 Vaccines Could Boost Immune Response

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Suzanne Simard is a professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia. Her own medical journey inspired her research into, among other things, the way yew trees communicate chemically with neighboring trees for their mutual defense. Brendan George Ko/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Brendan George Ko/Penguin Random House

Trees Talk To Each Other. 'Mother Tree' Ecologist Hears Lessons For People, Too

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The Shout at Cancer choir, pictured above in 2018, is featured in Bill Brummel's new documentary, Can You Hear My Voice? Bill Brummel Productions hide caption

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Bill Brummel Productions

In The 'Shout At Cancer Choir,' No Voice Boxes Needed To Sing Out

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Fragile X syndrome involves changes in the X chromosome, as pictured in the four columns of chromosomes starting on the left. The fifth column, on the far right, shows two normal X chromosomes. Richard J. Green/Science Source hide caption

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Richard J. Green/Science Source

An Alzheimer's Drug May Boost Cognition In People With Fragile X Syndrome

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CVS is adding mental health counseling to the services offered at about a dozen of its stores with HealthHUBs in Florida, Pennsylvania and Texas. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

CVS To Offer In-Store Mental Health Counseling

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To understand vaccine-induced immunity more fully, researchers are comparing antibody levels in people who received the Moderna vaccine but still got COVID-19 with levels in people who got the vaccine but didn't fall ill. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

New Blood Tests Should Show How Long A COVID-19 Vaccine Will Protect You

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The newly sequenced Canada lynx genome has already offered hints of how the North American wildcat might adapt — or not — to climate change, researchers say. Keith Williams/Flickr hide caption

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Keith Williams/Flickr

25 Down And 71,632 To Go: Scientists Seek Genomes Of All Critters With A Backbone

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In an update on COVID-19 Wednesday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer discussed the state's efforts to expand the use of monoclonal antibody therapy to help those diagnosed with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. Michigan Office of the Governor/AP hide caption

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Michigan Office of the Governor/AP

Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Are A Cumbersome Tool Against Surges

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