Treatments : Shots - Health News Here you can find out how the practice of medicine is changing. We pull together the latest research on medical tests, drugs and other therapies.

Karin Bruwelheide handles an amputates limb that dates back to the Civil War. The bones were discovered by scientists at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History have been analyzing the bones to learn more about them and who they may have belonged to. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Civil War Battlefield 'Limb Pit' Reveals Work Of Combat Surgeons

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Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

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If you're at low risk for heart disease, an electrocardiogram shouldn't be a routine test for you, a panel of medical experts says. Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source hide caption

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Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source
Marina Muun for NPR

Her Son Is One Of The Few Children To Have 3 Parents' DNA

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A scientist from the Nadiya Clinic in Kiev, Ukraine inserts a needle into a fertilized egg to extract the DNA of a man and woman trying to have a baby. The clinic is combining the DNA from three different people to create babies for women who are infertile. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNA

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A genetic test could spare many women with a common form of breast cancer from receiving chemotherapy. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline

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"I'm one of the lucky ones," says Judy Perkins, of the immunotherapy treatment she got. The experimental approach seems to have eradicated her metastatic breast cancer." Courtesy of Judy Perkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Judy Perkins

Therapy Made From Patient's Immune System Shows Promise For Advanced Breast Cancer

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

When Scientists Develop Products From Personal Medical Data, Who Gets To Profit?

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A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore is developing a tumor-detecting algorithm for detecting pancreatic cancer. But first, they have to train computers to distinguish between organs. Courtesy of The Felix Project hide caption

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Courtesy of The Felix Project

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence

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Concussions from domestic violence are sometimes overlooked in patient care. MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images

Domestic Violence's Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury

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While Baby Duke Brothers stayed in the NICU, his parents could watch over him via web cam. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Cameras On Preemies Let In Families, Keep Germs Out

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Food and Drug Commissioner Scott Gottlieb tweeted Tuesday that he is ready to implement a right-to-try law "in a way that achieves Congress' intent to promote access and protect patients." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Patients in the study had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs — on the average, $500 — when they visited a physical therapist first," says Bianca Frogner, a health economist at the University of Washington. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids

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The Food and Drug Administration approves more than 99 percent of applications for compassionate use of experimental medicines. But supporters of a right-to-try law want a more direct approach. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Herceptin has proved to be effective in prolonging the lives of the 12 percent of women with breast cancer whose malignancy hasn't spread to other organs, and whose cancer is HER2-positive. But side effects can be a problem. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

The prehensile tailed skink from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea has green blood due to high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin. The green bile pigment in the blood overwhelms the intense crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a striking lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU hide caption

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Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU

Why Do Some Lizards Have Green Blood?

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Dr. Paul Marik (left) discusses patient care with medical students and resident physicians during morning rounds at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in 2014 in Norfolk, Va. Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?

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