Morning Rounds: Diabetes Debate, Private Insurance Benefits, Hugging Bandits : Shots - Health News Morning Rounds: Type 1 diabetes in the news as cases expected to double by 2020, CBO says private health insurance market key to health overhaul this year, texting teens also like to hug a lot.
NPR logo

Morning Rounds: Diabetes Debate, Private Insurance Benefits, Hugging Bandits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104649128/104657919" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Morning Rounds: Diabetes Debate, Private Insurance Benefits, Hugging Bandits

Morning Rounds: Diabetes Debate, Private Insurance Benefits, Hugging Bandits

Good Morning. Diabetes is in the spotlight as physicians weigh in over whether U.S. Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor's Type 1 diabetes should affect her eligibility.

NPR's Richard Knox and the BBC report today that Type 1 -- requiring frequent monitoring of blood sugar levels and regular injections of insulin -- is expected to double by 2020 in children under 5. And no one knows exactly why.

Listen to Knox's radio story here:

Morning Rounds: Diabetes Debate, Private Insurance Benefits, Hugging Bandits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104649128/104657919" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Healthy Private Insurers Key To Health Overhaul

One reason Hillary Clinton's health plan overhaul failed 15 years ago? Republicans seized on a Congressional Budget Office report saying that her proposal to require everyone to buy health insurance would be a tax and a massive expansion of the federal government, says the Washington Post.

Yesterday, CBO issued a report saying if there is a mandate to buy health insurance in this go-around, a robust and private insurance market would be the key to keeping it out of the tax and expand danger zone.

CBO Director Douglas Elmendorf wrote on his blog:

"In CBO's view, the key consideration is whether a proposal would be making health insurance an essentially governmental program, tightly controlled by the federal government with little choice available to those who offer and buy health insurance -- or whether the system would provide significant flexibility in terms of the types, prices and number of private-sector sellers of insurance available to people."

Hug Happy Teens

Yesterday we pointed you to the New York Times piece about the potentially damaging effects of too much teen texting. Today the times says school officials are worried teens are also doing too much casual hugging, greeting friends daily as if they had been separated all summer. They don't even need to hold up a sign, like the Free Hug folks in the video above.

Are the two related?

Key explanation from parent Dona Eichner, mother of two girls attending a New Jersey high school:

"Maybe it's because all these kids do is text and go on Facebook so they don't even have human contact anymore."

Hold onto that thought.