Webcast: Your Workplace And Your Health : Shots - Health News Stress, violence and bullying are among key workplace health issues that people reported in our new poll. A discussion at Harvard on the issues was livestreamed Monday and will be archived here.
NPR logo Webcast: Your Workplace And Your Health

Webcast: Your Workplace And Your Health

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health YouTube

Your workplace may be affecting your health — for better or worse.

It can raise your stress level and affect your eating and sleeping habits. Negative impacts from work may arise from concern about such things as workplace violence, toxic exposures and a bullying boss.

Some companies have expansive programs to eliminate these problems and help workers improve health. But are workers taking advantage of them?

A new poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and released Monday, explores these issues and details the effect your workplace can have on your health.

One of the highlights of our coverage of the poll's findings includes a discussion with workplace and health experts at The Forum at the Harvard Chan school.

The discussion was livestreamed at 12 pm ET Monday and is archived here.

Some of the issues discussed: What are the factors that create a stressful workplace? What are some of the successful strategies that businesses have used to lower stress and foster better health? Is a broader, more communitywide approach needed to improve wellness?

Joe Neel, deputy senior supervising editor on NPR's Science Desk, moderated the discussion with:

  • John Quelch, professor of business administration, Harvard Business School, and professor in the department of health policy and management, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Marjorie Paloma, director at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Glorian Sorensen, professor of social and behavioral sciences and principal investigator, Center for Work, Health and Wellbeing, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Robert Blendon, professor of health policy and political analysis, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Kennedy School