Invisibilia: He Mocked Celebrity, Then Came To Crave It Himself : Shots - Health News This week the NPR program Invisibilia talks with a guy who despised our mindless worship of celebrities. So he devised an elaborate prank. It succeeded in ways he never would have anticipated.
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Invisibilia: He Mocked Celebrity, Then Came To Crave It Himself

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Invisibilia: He Mocked Celebrity, Then Came To Crave It Himself

Invisibilia: He Mocked Celebrity, Then Came To Crave It Himself

Invisibilia: He Mocked Celebrity, Then Came To Crave It Himself

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487817962/487884895" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When he was in college, the thing that enraged Brett Cohen the most was celebrity culture. One day he had the idea to mock it by pretending to be a celebrity, gathering a fake entourage and walking through Midtown Manhattan. It was a big success, and then a film he made of the day went viral.

But there was one small problem: Once Cohen tasted fame, even fake fame, he discovered that he didn't want to give it up.

This week the NPR podcast and show Invisibilia explores how people change from the outside in. We look at an all-women debate team in Rwanda, a country that has declared gender equality. We look at twins who introduced an app into their relationship and how it changed them. And a man who met a bird that transformed his view of the world.

In Shots, we find out about a decidedly cuddly way that people with diabetes are trying to avoid dangerously low blood sugar — a diabetes alert dog. Could dogs be better than a continuous glucose monitor? And we ask a law professor if we should be worried about medical privacy when we surf the Web or use fitness apps. It turns out that people might already know more than you could possibly imagine.

Shots - Health News

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