Shots - Health News NPR's online health program

Opponents of abortion rights rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court during The March for Life on Friday in Washington, D.C. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

As mother and daughter, Carmen and Gisele Grayson thought their DNA ancestry tests would be very similar. Boy were they surprised. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

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Kate Murphy felt frustrated by a lack of advice from doctors on how to use medical marijuana to mitigate side effects from her cancer treatment. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Doctors in Miami found that a man's tattoo expressing his end-of-life wishes was more confusing than helpful. Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images

Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

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The Department of Health and Humans Services is adding a Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in some kinds of care because of moral or religious objections. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

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Aaron Hernandez (81), of the New England Patriots, lost his helmet during this play against the New York Jets in 2011. Hernandez killed himself in 2017, and researchers found that he had had one of the most severe cases of CTE ever seen in someone his age. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

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Elsa/Getty Images

Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

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Dr. Mathilde Krim at the World AIDS Day Symposium presented by the Foundation For AIDS Research and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2002. Krim had a knack for helping people talk about HIV/AIDS rationally, colleagues say. Theo Wargo/WireImage hide caption

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Theo Wargo/WireImage

Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

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Ronda Goldfein, attorney and executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, holds an envelope that revealed a person's HIV status through the clear window. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Aetna Agrees To Pay $17 Million In HIV Privacy Breach

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Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Rebeca Gonzalez says she can now afford to buy pomegranates for her family in Garden Grove, Calif., because of the extra money she receives through Más Fresco, a food stamp incentive program for purchasing produce. Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News

Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, at a White House press conference in May. More people moving off Medicaid, she says, would be a good outcome. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

New Rules May Make Getting And Staying On Medicaid More Difficult

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