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Shots - Health News

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The Massachusetts Alcohol and Substance Abuse Center in Plymouth houses men for court-mandated addiction treatment. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Prison For Forced Addiction Treatment? A Parent's 'Last Resort' Has Consequences

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Gail Gray suffers from degenerative disk disease and takes daily painkillers. Her pharmacist was arrested in a recent federal justice department sting. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Amid Opioid Prescriber Crackdown, Health Officials Reach Out To Pain Patients

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The habit of ordering unneeded tests and treatments drives up medical costs. It's a pattern doctors often learn in medical school and residency. Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images hide caption

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Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images

The out-of-pocket expense of mammograms, MRIs and other tests and treatments can be several thousand dollars each year when you have a high-deductible health policy. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

David Vetter, pictured in September 1982 inside part of the bubble environment that was his protective home until he died in 1984. Today most kids born with severe combined immunodeficiency are successfully treated with bone marrow transplants, but researchers think gene therapy is the future. AP hide caption

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AP

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease

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The image on the left shows the brains of pigs that were untreated for 10 hours after death, with neurons appearing as green, astrocytes as red and cell nuclei as blue. The image on the right shows cells in the same area of brains that, four hours after death, were hooked up to a system that the Yale University researchers call BrainEx. Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine hide caption

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Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine

Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs

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A large new study finds mixed results for the effectiveness of programs aimed at motivating healthful behavior — such as more exercise and better nutrition — among employees. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

CRISPR gene-editing technology allows scientists to make highly precise modifications to DNA. The technology is now starting to be used in human trials to treat several diseases in the U.S. Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

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A nurse prepares the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in Haverstraw, N.Y. Several measles outbreaks in New York state are contributing to this year's unusually high measles rates. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Measles Outbreak 'Accelerates,' Health Officials Warn

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Teen romance gone wrong can be dangerous for girls. Around 7 percent of teen homicides between 2003 and 2016 were committed by intimate partners, and girls were the victims in 90 percent of those deaths. Ross Anania/Getty Images hide caption

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Ross Anania/Getty Images

Jessica Calise checks on Joseph as he gets ready for bed. Joseph used to be afraid to sleep alone, but he has learned to be OK with it since his mother learned new parenting approaches. Christopher Capozziello for NPR hide caption

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Christopher Capozziello for NPR

For Kids With Anxiety, Parents Learn To Let Them Face Their Fears

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The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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stock_colors/Getty Images

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

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Nurse practitioner Debra Brown guides patient Merdis Wells through a diabetic retinopathy exam at University Medical Center in New Orleans. Courtesy of IDx hide caption

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Courtesy of IDx

How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?

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Safehouse is considering locating in this block of Hilton Street in the Kensington section of Philadelphia. The proposed facility would allow drug users to inject under medical supervision. The neighborhood is known for its drug use. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Supporters Sue To Open Safe Injection Site In Philadelphia, Citing Religious Freedom

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In the Tennessee Capitol, state Rep. Matthew Hill took heat from abortion-rights proponents last month who had gathered to protest a bill he favored that would ban abortions after about six weeks' pregnancy. That legislation was eventually thwarted in the Tennessee Senate, however, when some of his fellow Republicans voted it down, fearing the high cost of court challenges. Sergio Martinez-Beltran/WPLN hide caption

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Sergio Martinez-Beltran/WPLN

Republican State Lawmakers Split Over Anti-Abortion Strategy

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A guard escorts a detained immigrant from his "segregation cell" back into the general population at the Adelanto Detention Facility in November 2013. Today the privately run ICE facility in Adelanto, Calif., houses nearly 2,000 men and women and has come under sharp criticism by the California attorney general and other investigators for health and safety problems. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Watchdogs Cite Lax Medical And Mental Health Treatment Of ICE Detainees

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Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., introduced the Medicare for All Act of 2019 on Capitol Hill Wednesday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Fisher-Price has recalled its popular Rock 'n Play sleeper, after the Consumer Product Safety Commission confirmed that least 30 babies' deaths were linked to it. Courtesy of US Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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Courtesy of US Consumer Product Safety Commission
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