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Shots - Health News

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Fecal transplantation is an experimental procedure to treat intestinal conditions, including recurrent, antibiotic-resistant Clostridium difficile infection. But if the donor stool is not properly screened, it can spread other illnesses. SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Science Source hide caption

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SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Science Source

In many rural areas, helicopters are the only speedy way to get patients to a trauma center or hospital burn unit. As more than 100 rural hospitals have closed around the U.S. since 2010, the need for air transport has only increased. Ollo/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollo/Getty Images

Bonnielin Swenor, an assistant professor of ophthalmology, has myopic macular degeneration. It hasn't stopped her from having a prolific career as a researcher and epidemiologist. But until recently, she rarely discussed her disability with her peers, worried they would judge or dismiss her. Christopher Myers hide caption

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Christopher Myers

Drug agents last fall worked with a Minneapolis police SWAT team to seize just under 171 pounds of methamphetamine. Many U.S. states say they face an escalating problem with meth and drugs other than opioids. Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP hide caption

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Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP

Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law. Mary Smyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Smyth/Getty Images

Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

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'Patients Will Die': One County's Challenge To Trump's 'Conscience Rights' Rule

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Michigan State University doctoral student Mike Morrison has a redesign for scientific posters to spell out their main point in big, easy-to-read letters. Courtesy of Mike Morrison hide caption

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Courtesy of Mike Morrison

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over

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In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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An MRI scan of a person listening to music shows brain areas that respond. (This scan wasn't part of the research comparing humans and monkeys.) KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source hide caption

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KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source

A Musical Brain May Help Us Understand Language And Appreciate Tchaikovsky

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Jeannine sorts through a binder of writing assignments from her therapy. In keeping a journal about her past experiences with pain, she noticed that the pain symptoms began when she was around 8 — a time of escalating family trauma at home. Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?

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Thor Ringler (right) interviewed Ray Miller (left) in Miller's hospital room at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital in Madison, Wis., in April. Miller's daughter Barbara (center) brought in photos and a press clipping from Miller's time in the National Guard to help facilitate the conversation. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Storytelling Helps Hospital Staff Discover The Person Within The Patient

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The best help for patients struggling with addiction, eating disorders or other mental health problems sometimes includes intensive therapy, the evidence shows. But many patients still have trouble getting their health insurers to cover needed mental health treatment. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies

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A border collie jumps to catch a flying disc during a competition. New research suggests that dog stress mirrors owner stress, especially in dogs and humans who compete together. Bela Szandelszky/AP hide caption

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Bela Szandelszky/AP

You May Be Stressing Out Your Dog

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