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Shots - Health News

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Some insurers using this new payment model offer a single fee to one OB-GYN or medical practice, which then uses part of that money to cover the hospital care involved in labor and delivery. Other insurers opt to cut a separate contract with the hospital. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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Adene Sanchez/Getty Images

A woman exhales a puff of vapor from a Juul pen in Vancouver, Wash. Television broadcasters including Viacom, CBS and WarnerMedia announced they are no longer running e-cigarette ads. Craig Mitchelldyer/AP hide caption

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Craig Mitchelldyer/AP

A pharmacist collects packets of boxed medication from the shelves of a pharmacy in London, U.K. A proposal announced by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Thursday would allow the government to directly negotiate the price of 250 U.S. drugs, using what the drugs cost in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, and the United Kingdom as a baseline. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

How An 'International Price Index' Might Help Reduce Drug Prices

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Patients hospitalized with vaping-related illness often have severe pneumonia, and this kind of inflammation can create long-term damage, doctors say. alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

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Cameron and Katlynn Fischer celebrated their April wedding in Colorado. But the day before, Cameron was in such bad shape from a bachelor party hangover that he headed to an emergency room to be rehydrated. That's when their financial headaches began. Courtesy of Cameron Fischer hide caption

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Courtesy of Cameron Fischer

A colored computerized tomography (CT) scan of an axial section of the brain of a 59-year-old patient with a malignant (cancerous) glioblastoma brain tumor. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

Deadly Brain Cancers Act Like 'Vampires' By Hijacking Normal Cells To Grow

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Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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A group gathers at the state capitol in Austin, Texas, in May to protest abortion restrictions. In defiance of the state's ban on city funding of abortion providers, the Austin City Council has found a workaround to help women seeking the procedure. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As Texas Cracks Down On Abortion, Austin Votes To Help Women Defray Costs

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A survey of women ages 18 to 44 found that for an estimated 3.3 million women in that age group, were raped before they ever had a sexual encounter. Researchers say if the numbers included all women they'd be much higher. Aneta Pucia / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Aneta Pucia / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Bridget Desmukes (center) and her husband, Jeffrey, love having a big, active family. "The kids are always climbing on things, flipping all the time — it's not dull," she says, laughing. Because Desmukes had developed preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, her OB-GYN recommended low-dose aspirin at her first prenatal appointment this past spring. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

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Visitors and park rangers at historic Fort Scott check out a medevac helicopter operated by Midwest AeroCare during the Kansas town's Good Ol' Days festival. Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News

Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

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An FDA committee voted to approve Palforzia, a new treatment for peanut allergy. The treatment is a form of oral immunotherapy intended to desensitize the immune system to peanuts. Lauri Patterson/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauri Patterson/Getty Images

With suicides on the rise, the government wants to make the national crisis hotline easier to use. A proposed three-digit number — 988 — could replace the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

President Trump speaks to the press with first lady Melania Trump and Acting Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Norman Sharpless (left) and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar in the Oval Office at the White House on Wednesday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

FDA To Banish Flavored E-Cigarettes To Combat Youth Vaping

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These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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Tracy Lee for NPR

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

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The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

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Shots - Health News

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