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Shots - Health News

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Suboxone, a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, helps many people addicted to opioids wean themselves from an escalating drug habit. But counseling and social support are key to successful treatment, too, experts say. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Traffic is light on East First Street after the new restrictions went into effect at midnight as the coronavirus pandemic spreads on March 20, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statewide stay at home order for Californias 40 million residents except for necessary activities in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

The mouthpiece of a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) device delivers enough pressurized air to keep the breathing passage of someone who has obstructive sleep apnea open throughout the night. Dr P. Marazzi/Science Source hide caption

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Dr P. Marazzi/Science Source

Dr. Deborah Birx, who coordinates the White House Coronavirus Task Force, criticized a test "where 50% or 47% are false positives" at a briefing on March 17. Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, headquartered near Tarrytown, N.Y., is just one of the companies now working to identify and reproduce large quantities of antibodies that could prevent or treat COVID-19. Senior R&D Specialist Kristen Pascal works on COVID-19 research for Regeneron. Rani Levy/Regeneron Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Rani Levy/Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has been a fixture at most of the president's daily coronavirus task force press briefings. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Prepare For Outbreaks Like New York's In Other States, Warns Anthony Fauci

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After the Food and Drug Administration granted Gilead Sciences orphan drug status for its experimental drug remdesivir on Tuesday, Gilead asked that the agency rescind that status Wednesday. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump takes questions from reporters Monday. Joining him at the press briefing on coronavirus are Vice President Pence; Attorney General William Barr; Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator; and Navy Rear Adm. John Polowczyk, who leads FEMA's task force on the supply chain. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Doctors test a hospital staffer Tuesday for coronavirus, in a triage tent that's been set up outside the E.R. at St. Barnabas hospital in the Bronx. Hospital workers are at higher risk of getting COVID-19, and public health experts fear a staffing shortage in the U.S. is coming. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Getty Images

States Get Creative To Find And Deploy More Health Workers In COVID-19 Fight

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Dr. Esther Johnston of HealthPoint Community Health Center says her clinic in Auburn, Washington has overhauled how it sees patients, shifting resources away from routine primary care to pandemic response by necessity. Will Stone for NPR hide caption

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Will Stone for NPR

Coronavirus testing capacity has begun to expand, with drive-through testing starting up in many places. But experts warn we still need to vastly expand testing to control the outbreak. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using supercomputers to calculate which drugs may help in the fight against the coronavirus. Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory hide caption

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Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Her Incredible Sense Of Smell Is Helping Scientists Find New Ways To Diagnose Disease

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Transmission electron micrograph of particles of SARS-CoV-2 — the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID/Flickr

Why Hoarding Of Hydroxychloroquine Needs To Stop

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A nurse examines a pregnant woman in a private obstetric hospital in Wuhan, China, in February. Research from China suggests pregnancy does not make women more vulnerable to the coronavirus. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/Getty Images

Gilead Sciences, headquartered in Foster City, Calif., makes remdesivir, one of the experimental drugs now being investigated as a possible treatment for COVID-19. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Might The Experimental Drug Remdesivir Work Against COVID-19?

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There's a growing need for volunteer doctors to help treat patients infected with coronavirus. Reza Estakhrian/Getty Images hide caption

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Reza Estakhrian/Getty Images
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