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Shots - Health News

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A researcher at Peking University's Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics conducts tests on May 14. Scientists are confronting their biases and learning to engage with science from places they're unfamiliar with. Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images

In 2009, Australia's deadliest bushfires on record destroyed Kinglake, a town just over an hour's drive northeast of Melbourne. The disaster had long-term effects on families. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

It wasn't easy in early March to get a test in the U.S. confirming you had the coronavirus — scarce availability of tests meant patients had to meet strict criteria linked to a narrow set of symptoms and particular travel history. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Specimens collected from multiple people can be combined into one batch to test for the coronavirus. A negative result would clear all the specimens. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Pooling Coronavirus Tests Can Spare Scarce Supplies, But There's A Catch

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Peet Sapsin directs clients inside custom built "Gainz Pods", during his HIIT class, (high intensity interval training), at Sapsins Inspire South Bay Fitness, Redondo Beach, California, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Recent protests in Philadelphia and across the country have drawn young people. But for most of the pandemic, youth have been quarantined and away from their social circles, which could make depression and other mental illness worse. Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19

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With new coronavirus infections climbing in most states, infectious disease experts are discouraging group get-togethers, especially those that involve drinking. In this photo patrons enjoy a beer outside the Central Market in Los Angeles, this week. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Medical personnel prepare to test hundreds of people for the coronavirus. They lined up in vehicles last week in a Phoenix neighborhood. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Drill Down To County Level And The U.S. COVID-19 Outbreak Looks Even Worse

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Amber England, who led the successful campaign for a ballot initiative to give 200,000 more Oklahomans health coverage, talked with supporters online this week. Voters narrowly approved the Medicaid expansion measure Tuesday, despite opposition by the state's governor and legislature. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Tuesday. Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images

Fauci: Mixed Messaging On Masks Set U.S. Public Health Response Back

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Dr. Danielle Hairston, a psychiatry residency director at Howard University in Washington, D.C., trains and mentors young black doctors. Quraishia Ford hide caption

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Quraishia Ford

To Be Young, A Doctor And Black: Overcoming Racial Barriers In Medical Training

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A new interactive map and dashboard lets you find out how bad your county's coronavirus outbreak is. Harvard Global Health Institute/Microsoft AI/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Harvard Global Health Institute/Microsoft AI/Screenshot by NPR

Green, Yellow, Orange Or Red? This New Tool Shows COVID-19 Risk In Your County

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Dr. Danielle Ofri, author of When We Do Harm: A Doctor Confronts Medical Error, says medical mistakes are likely to increase as resource-strapped hospitals treat a rapid influx of COVID-19 patients. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A Doctor Confronts Medical Errors — And Flaws In The System That Create Mistakes

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NPR

As Coronavirus Surges, How Much Testing Does Your State Need To Subdue The Virus?

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Insurers must cover coronavirus testing, according to federal law, but medical visits to discuss symptoms may not be covered, unless a test is ordered at that time. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

She Went To The ER To Try To Get A Coronavirus Test And Ended Up $1,840 In Debt

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Gilead Sciences, maker of the antiviral drug remdesivir, has come up with a price for the COVID-19 treatment that was less than some analysts expected. ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment

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Then-Director of the National Institutes of Health Elias Zerhouni speaks with President George W. Bush during a round table discussion on cancer prevention at the NIH in Bethesda, Md., in 2007. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Internationally, scientists now have on file the genomes of more than 47,000 different samples of the virus that causes COVID-19 — up from just one in January. Here's a transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles (orange) isolated from a patient. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institutes of Health hide caption

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institutes of Health

This Coronavirus Doesn't Change Quickly, And That's Good News For Vaccine Makers

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Kai Koerber, a rising sophomore at the University of California, Berkeley, is a survivor of the 2018 mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Since then, he says, he's made promoting a mental health curriculum in high schools and colleges a personal priority. Brittany Hosea-Small hide caption

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Brittany Hosea-Small

'Bear Our Pain': The Plea For More Black Mental Health Workers

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Plastic fencing and landscaping boulders replaced homeless campsites on this block in downtown Denver. Advocates for the homeless fear that displacing encampments risks spreading the coronavirus throughout the homeless community. Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News
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