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Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

In her new book, Modern Madness: An Owner's Manual, Terri Cheney, who lives with bipolar disorder, shares advice for dealing with anxiety and depression and helping loved ones through a crisis. Neha Gupta/Getty Images hide caption

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Neha Gupta/Getty Images

English coronavirus patients George Gilbert, 85, and his wife, Domneva Gilbert, 84, were part of a clinical trial that included Eli Lilly & Co.'s baricitinib. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Experimental Medicines For COVID-19 Could Help Someday, But Home Runs Not Guaranteed

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Nicole Xu for NPR

How The Pandemic Is Widening The Racial Wealth Gap

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About 1 In 5 Households In U.S. Cities Miss Needed Medical Care During Pandemic

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Scientists used light to control the firing of specific cells to artificially create a rhythm in the brain that acted like the drug ketamine enjoynz/Getty Images hide caption

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enjoynz/Getty Images

Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

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People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Mercy Hospital & Medical Center survived the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 ― but it lost the battle of modern health care economics. In July, Chicago's first hospital told regulators that it will end inpatient services as soon as February. Taylor Glascock for KHN hide caption

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Taylor Glascock for KHN

Architects say making the office more like the outdoors — with filtered air and good ventilation — will be a priority post-pandemic. This living wall in the Danielle N. Ripich Commons at the University of New England in Biddeford, Maine, is one such approach. Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
Jesse Zhang for NPR

A COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Only 50% Effective. Is That Good Enough?

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Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/Getty Images

As COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Move At Warp Speed, Recruiting Black Volunteers Takes Time

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Worried registered nurses held a vigil in July at Sutter Health's Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, Calif., to remember their colleague Janine Paiste-Ponder, who caught the coronavirus, likely from a patient, and died from complications. National Nurses United hide caption

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National Nurses United
Kim Ryu for NPR

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Nearly Half Of U.S. Households Face A Financial Crisis

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. A drug to achieve the same effect was recently tested in space. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Drug That Bulked Up Mice In Space Might Someday Help Astronauts Make Long Voyages

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A recent survey found 62% of people in the U.S. with anorexia experienced a worsening of symptoms after the pandemic hit. And nearly a third of Americans with binge-eating disorder, which is far more common, reported an increase in episodes. Boogich/Getty Images hide caption

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Boogich/Getty Images

Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat

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A scientist at work on a COVID-19 vaccine candidate at Bogazici University in Istanbul in August. Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

How Can You Tell If A COVID-19 Vaccine Is Working?

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The annual town meeting in North Andover, Mass., which dates back to 1646, was held outside on June 16 on a high school football field to help keep participants a safe distance from each other. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Dr. Scott Atlas is President Trump's new coronavirus adviser. His ideas are sometimes at odds with those of public health professionals. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

President Trump's New COVID-19 Adviser Is Making Public Health Experts Nervous

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People roamed the beach in Ocean City, N.J, at the start of August. As Labor Day weekend arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says Americans should remain vigilant to avoid another surge in coronavirus infection rates. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Another Holiday Weekend, Another Coronavirus Surge? Keep An Eye On Tourist Hot Spots

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This negative-stained transmission electron micrograph depicts the ultrastructural details of an influenza virus particle, or virion. Frederick Murphy/CDC hide caption

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Frederick Murphy/CDC

Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix

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Shots - Health News

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