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Shots - Health News

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Since moving into her own place, Rita Stewart says, she feels healthier, supported and hasn't returned to the emergency room. "This is a chance for me to take care of myself better." Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

The COVID-19 pandemic has been particularly difficult for unpaid caregivers, with many reporting symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. Portra Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images via Getty Images

Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic

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A teen gets a dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine last month at Holtz Children's Hospital in Miami. Nearly 7 million U.S. teens and preteens (ages 12 through 17) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine so far, the CDC says. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Kayla Northam's weight topped 300 pounds as a teenager. She'd started to develop diabetes, and liver and joint problems before seeking bariatric surgery about a decade ago at age 18. Kayla Northam hide caption

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Kayla Northam

Bariatric Surgery Works, But Isn't Offered To Most Teens Who Have Severe Obesity

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A sticker reads, "I got vaccinated," at a vaccination site inside Penn Station last month in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images
Joy Ho for NPR

5 Ways To Stop Summer Colds From Making The Rounds In Your Family

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Portrait of Phillip Lyn taken by his spouse, Kurt Rehwinkel, outside their home in St. Louis. Kurt Rehwinkel hide caption

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Kurt Rehwinkel

For Those Facing Alzheimer's, A Controversial Drug Offers Hope

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Giving people with organ transplants a third dose of the mRNA vaccines for COVID-19 appears to boost their immunity, according to a new study. Joseph Prezioso /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso /AFP via Getty Images

The infectious and contagious rabies virus, shown here in a colorized micrograph, can be transmitted to humans through the bite or saliva of an infected animal. Thanks to protective vaccination of pets, rabies was eliminated from the U.S. dog population in 2007, though a bite from infected bats, skunks and raccoons can still transmit the virus. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Science Source

The U.S. Bans Importing Dogs From 113 Countries After Rise In False Rabies Records

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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Anti-Vaccine Activists Use A Federal Database To Spread Fear About COVID Vaccines

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Mark Forrest is back fishing after rehabilitation with the IpsiHand device helped him regain use of his right hand. Mark Forrest hide caption

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Mark Forrest

New Device Taps Brain Signals To Help Stroke Patients Regain Hand Function

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

States Scale Back Pandemic Reporting, Stirring Alarm

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Poverty and disability are linked to lower vaccination rates in some rural communities. The Vaccination Transportation Initiative sponsored van helps rural residents get the COVID-19 vaccine in rural Mississippi. The effort works to overcome the lack of transportation and access to technology for rural residents. Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Therapist Kiki Radermacher was one of the first members of a mobile crisis response unit in Missoula, Mont., which started responding to emergency mental health calls last year. That pilot project becomes permanent in July and is one of six such teams in the state — up from one in 2019. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

A woman receives the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 at a drive-in vaccination event last week in Meerbusch, Germany. Lukas Schulze/Getty Images hide caption

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Lukas Schulze/Getty Images

New Evidence Suggests COVID-19 Vaccines Remain Effective Against Variants

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By the time Victoria Cooper enrolled in an alcohol treatment program in 2018, she was "drinking for survival," not pleasure, she says — multiple vodka shots in the morning, at lunchtime and beyond. In the treatment program, she saw other women in their 20s struggling with alcohol and other drugs. "It was the first time in a very long time that I had not felt alone," she says. Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope

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A movie released online by Children's Health Defense, an anti-vaccine group headed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr., resurfaces disproven claims about the dangers of vaccines and targets its messages at Black Americans who may have ongoing concerns about racism in medical care. Iryna Veklich/Getty Images hide caption

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Iryna Veklich/Getty Images

An Anti-Vaccine Film Targeted To Black Americans Spreads False Information

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In this 2009 photo, Stephen Cox (left), Mike Forte (center), and Maria Gallo (right), all medical students then, were busy studying a cadaver in the lab at Rocky Vista University's Parker, Colo., campus. Rocky Vista, a for-profit institution, last month received the green light for an accredited satellite campus in Billings, Mont. Ken Lyons/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken Lyons/Denver Post via Getty Images

A vial of the experimental Novavax coronavirus vaccine is ready for use in a London study in 2020. Novavax's vaccine candidate contains a noninfectious bit of the virus — the spike protein — with a substance called an adjuvant added that helps the body generate a strong immune response. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

A New Type Of COVID-19 Vaccine Could Debut Soon

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Dr. William Burke reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix in 2018. An experimental Alzheimer's drug from Biogen and Eisai is on the verge of a Food and Drug Administration decision. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Poised For Decision On Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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Shots - Health News

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