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Drug addiction is a big concern to rural Americans, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Alice Goldfarb/NPR hide caption

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Alice Goldfarb/NPR

NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic

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President Donald Trump listened in January as Stephen Ubl, President and CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, second from left, introduced himself during a meeting at the White House. The sky-high prices of some drugs are a big issue for some voters this fall. Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images hide caption

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Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

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According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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Shared scooters and bicycles are spreading to several major U.S. cities while policymakers are scrambling to find ways to ensure that riders are safe. David Paul Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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As E-Scooters Roll Into American Cities, So Do Safety Concerns

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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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DNA sleuthing helped identify Joseph James DeAngelo, the suspected East Area Rapist, who was arraigned in a Sacramento, Calif., courtroom in April. Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns

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A 291-day-old retina. Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process, which could help accelerate efforts to cure colorblindness and lead to new treatments for diseases. Johns Hopkins University hide caption

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Johns Hopkins University

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision

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As Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, campaigns for re-election, he has warned that 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions could lose health coverage. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Randy and Karen O'Burke together at their son's home in Hendersonville, Tenn., last week. "Apparently, I'm pretty much of a miracle," Randy says. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU

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Ed Rendell, former governor of Pennsylvania, has taken a strong stand on supervised injection sites. Andrew Harrer/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Getty Images

'Come And Arrest Me': Former Pa. Governor Defies Justice Department On Safe Injection

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Richard Langford, at home in East Nashville, Tenn., still has significant trouble with mental focus and memory issues 10 years after a sudden and serious infection landed him in the hospital ICU for several weeks. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

When ICU Delirium Leads To Symptoms Of Dementia After Discharge

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Delayed pushing made no difference in whether first-time mothers had a cesarean section, a large study finds. Getty Images hide caption

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When Giving Birth For The First Time, Push Away

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As a counselor, Niasha Fray saw firsthand the obstacles black women face in breast cancer treatment. She's now program director of the Duke Center for Community and Population Health Improvement. Justin Cook for NPR hide caption

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Justin Cook for NPR

If you like sudoku, go ahead and play. But staying sharp means using many parts of your brain. Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images

A Brain Scientist Who Studies Alzheimer's Explains How She Stays Mentally Fit

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Some apps, like CBT-I Coach, use proven scientific methods to help people manage their underlying sleep challenges. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Some Apps May Help Curb Insomnia, Others Just Put You To Sleep

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Suboxone, a medicine to treat opioid addiction, helps people struggling with substance abuse by blocking their cravings and physical withdrawal symptoms. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was asked about his drinking during testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27. Tom Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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Psychologists find that cognitive processing therapy — a type of counseling that helps people learn to challenge and modify their beliefs related to a trauma — can be useful in healing the mental health problems some experience after a sexual assault. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Can a sexual assault increase your risk of high blood pressure, even years later? Recent research suggests yes. Fabio Pagani/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabio Pagani/EyeEm/Getty Images

Antibiotics are widely overprescribed for the common cold. Doctors' concern for patient satisfaction ratings may be one reason. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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