Shots - Health News NPR's online health program

In a study of nearly 5,600 U.S. youths ages 12 to 17, about 6 percent say they've engaged in some sort of digital self-harm. More than half in that subgroup say they've bullied themselves this way more than once. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

Susan Nelson, author and public speaker on brain injury awareness and gun safety, at her home in Austin, Texas. Nelson survived a point-blank gunshot to the head in 1993. Gabriel C. Perez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Perez/KUT

Catherine Fitzgerald, the author's mother, spent four nights in a hospital after falling in her home. But Medicare refused to pay for her rehab care, saying she had only been an inpatient for one night. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Ogechi Ukachu, one of the registered nurses recently hired to help staff D.C.'s "Right Care Right Now" program, takes a training call at the city's 911 call center. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Can Triage Nurses Help Prevent 911 Overload?

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Researchers used a gene-carrying virus to fix blood stem cells that were then used to treat patients with beta-thalassemia. Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

How do we make sense of all that chatter? Ilana Kohn/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Getty Images

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of Sound

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In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, restorations are being made to a roof in Castañer, a village in Puerto Rico's central mountains. But recovery is slow. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

In A Puerto Rican Mountain Town, Hope Ebbs As The Hardship Continues

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Maryland's overturned law restricted the price of generic drugs, and had been hailed as a model for other states. It's one of a number of state initiatives designed to combat rapidly rising drug prices. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Mice may be adorable, but the droppings and the bacteria they contain, not so much. Mchugh Tom/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Mchugh Tom/Science Source/Getty Images

New York City Mice Carry Bacteria That Can Make People Sick

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Free-standing ERs tend to have lower standby costs than hospital-based facilities that have to be ready to treat dire injuries. But the free-standing ERs typically receive the same Medicare rate for emergency services. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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A combination of an immunotherapy drug from Merck and standard chemotherapy led to improved survival for cancer patients. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

The drug test developed by Aegis Sciences checks urine samples to help doctors determine if their patients are taking their blood pressure medicine. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Drug Test Spurs Frank Talk Between Hypertension Patients And Doctors

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University of Puget Sound chemist Dan Burgard keeps a freezer full of archived samples from two wastewater treatment plants in western Washington in case he needs to rerun the samples or analyze a specific drug he didn't test for the first time. Dan Burgard hide caption

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Dan Burgard

Under current law, Medicare requires patients to get a referral before seeing an audiologist to diagnose hearing loss. Leyla B / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Leyla B / EyeEm/Getty Images

Sen. Tammy Duckworth walks across stage at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. She is the first senator to give birth while serving in office. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

At a recent National LGBTQ Task Force conference in Washington D.C., Luis Felipe Cebas (right) from Whitman-Walker Health, talks with Sarah Fleming about PrEP, the pre-exposure drug that can help protect against HIV infection. Tyrone Turner/ WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/ WAMU

PrEP Campaign Aims To Block HIV Infection And Save Lives In D.C.

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Plaques located in the gray matter of the brain are key indicators of Alzheimer's disease. Cecil Fox/Science Source hide caption

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Cecil Fox/Science Source

Scientists Push Plan To Change How Researchers Define Alzheimer's

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Bill Of The Month: A Tale Of 2 CT Scanners — One Richer, One Poorer

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Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News