Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

David Taylor, who has muscular dystrophy, relies on a ventilator to live. During the power outages across Texas in February, he had to be transported to a hospital before his ventilator's backup battery ran out. Rodger Mallison/Undark Magazine hide caption

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Rodger Mallison/Undark Magazine

After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Gaylord High School principal Chris Hodges measures the space between seats in a yearbook class. A student in the class tested positive for covid, and Hodges is working with the local health department to trace people who might have been exposed to her at school. Brett Dahlberg/WCMU hide caption

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Brett Dahlberg/WCMU

A Principal And His Tape Measure: Schools Are Helping Do COVID-19 Contact Tracing

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Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says

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Many of the changes in health care that happened during the pandemic are likely here to stay, such as conferring with doctors online more frequently about medication and other treatments. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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d3sign/Getty Images

A man who is paralyzed was able to type with 95% accuracy by imagining that he was handwriting letters on a sheet of paper, a team reported in the journal Nature. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Man Who Is Paralyzed Communicates By Imagining Handwriting

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Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

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John Calhoun of Flathead County has diabetes and was convinced by an old friend to get vaccinated, through he suspects the coronavirus isn't as dangerous as health officials say it is. He's hoping vaccination will ease divisions over masking. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

This 16-year-old got a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 shot late last month at the UCI Health Family Health Center in Anaheim, Calif. Students as young as 12 are now eligible to get the vaccine, too, the FDA says. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

Carlene Knight, 54, is one of the first patients in a landmark study designed to try to restore vision in those who have a rare genetic disease that causes blindness. Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

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Scientists once compared the abilities of humans versus canines in tracking a trail of chocolate essential oil laid down in an open field. Though the humans weren't nearly as proficient as the dogs, they did get better with practice. Vladimir Godnik/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Vladimir Godnik/Getty Images/fStop

Even after full vaccination against COVID-19, people who have had organ transplants are urged by their doctors to keep wearing masks and taking extra precautions. Research shows the strong drugs they must take to prevent organ rejection can significantly blunt their body's response to the vaccine. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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Vaccination Against COVID 'Does Not Mean Immunity' For People With Organ Transplants

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Feelings of exhaustion, irritability and mental fogginess are our bodies' normal response to an abnormal year of pandemic life. Wenjin Chen/Getty Images hide caption

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Wenjin Chen/Getty Images

If Your Brain Feels Foggy And You're Tired All The Time, You're Not Alone

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Mixing different kinds of COVID-19 vaccines might help boost immune responses, but the idea has been slow to catch on. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Giving 2 Doses Of Different COVID-19 Vaccines Could Boost Immune Response

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