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Maria Banderas, left, answers questions from medical assistant Dolores Becerra on May 18 before getting a coronavirus test at St. Johns Well Child and Family Center in South Los Angeles, one of the LA neighborhoods hit hard by COVID-19. Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images

New Coronavirus Hot Spots Emerge Across South And In California, As Northeast Slows

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Tear gas rises as protesters face off with police during a demonstration on May 31 outside the White House over the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis Police. Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images

The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, receives an injection in May. Pfizer's candidate for a coronavirus vaccine is one of number that are in various stages of development around the world. University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP hide caption

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University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP

NIH Director Hopes For At Least 1 Safe And Effective Vaccine By Year's End

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President Trump announced in May that he was taking hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against COVID-19. But a study published Wednesday finds no evidence the drug is protective in this way. GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images

No Evidence Hydroxychloroquine Is Helpful In Preventing COVID-19, Study Finds

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At the Salt Lake County Health Department, a woman teaches new contact tracers on May 19 how to identify potential new exposures after a person tests positive for the coronavirus. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Routine physical exams once involved fewer gloves, masks and other safety measures. Today, doctors' offices and hospitals are taking many more precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Members of the Florida National Guard are seen at a coronavirus testing site on April 27 in North Miami. Restrictions are easing, but officials worry people might now hesitate to evacuate during a hurricane. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Hurricane Season Collides With Pandemic As Communities Plan For Dual Emergencies

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The pandemic and its economic fallout have made it harder for those who experience domestic violence to escape their abuser, say crisis teams, but the National Domestic Violence Hotline is one place to get quick help. Text LOVEIS to 1-866-331-9474 if speaking by phone feels too risky. Roos Koole/Getty Images hide caption

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Roos Koole/Getty Images

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

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Dr. Ming Lin was fired from his position as an emergency room physician at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham, Washington after publicly complaining about the hospital's infection control procedures during the pandmic. Yoshimi Lin hide caption

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Yoshimi Lin

Rosalind Pichardo advertises a daily food giveaway service in the heart of Philadelphia's Kensington neighborhood, where more people die of opioid overdoses than any other area in the city. Nina Feldman/ WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/ WHYY

For Opioid Users, Pandemic Means New Dangers, But Also New Treatment Options

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The IRS has announced that with employer approval, employees will be allowed to add, drop or alter some of their benefits — including flexible spending account contributions — for the remainder of 2020. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images

The Statue of Liberty is visible behind refrigeration trucks that function as temporary morgues at New York City's South Brooklyn Marine Terminal. "If you're driving by ... you might just assume that this was some sort of distribution hub," Time reporter W.J. Hennigan says. "But they are each filled with up to 90 bodies apiece." Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Reckoning With The Dead: Journalist Goes Inside An NYC COVID-19 Disaster Morgue

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