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A man receives the Pfizer COVID vaccine in Ramat Gan, Israel. A small Israeli study suggests vaccinated people who experience rare breakthrough infections may develop symptoms that last as long as six weeks. Amir Levy/Getty Images hide caption

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Amir Levy/Getty Images

COVID Symptoms May Linger In Some Vaccinated People Who Get Infected, Study Finds

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People stand in the International Arrivals area at Heathrow Airport in London on Jan. 26. The British government said that starting Monday, fully vaccinated travelers from the United States and much of Europe will be able to enter England without the need for quarantining. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

Tokyo reported 3,177 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, the highest number of infections recorded so far for the city. Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images

Simone Biles spoke at length about the reasons behind her withdrawal from the gymnastics team final. She's seen here on Wednesday with teammate MyKayla Skinner, as they watch the men's all-around final in Tokyo. Jamie Squire/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Jim Holland says his memories of being raped as an adolescent were triggered by the 2002-2004 Boston Globe Spotlight investigation of sexual abuse by priests. He lives in Quincy, Mass. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Men Who Have Been Sexually Abused Have Trouble Getting Treatment

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A female Anopheles mosquito, a common vector for malaria, feeds on human skin. In a landmark study, researchers showed that genetically modified Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes could crash their own species in an environment mimicking sub-Saharan Africa, where the malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread. Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons

How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct

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Tanzania's President Samia Suluhu Hassan receives her Johnson & Johnson vaccine against the coronavirus at the statehouse in Dar es Salaam on July 28. Her administration has reversed the government's anti-vaccination stance. Emmanuel Herman/Reuters hide caption

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Emmanuel Herman/Reuters

Health officials in Mobile recently set up a pop-up clinic at a food truck festival. Despite officials making a big effort encouraging Alabama residents to get vaccinated, numbers remain low as COVID infections increase. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Alabama's COVID-19 Vaccination Rate Is The Lowest In The U.S. And Infections Are Up

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Dr. Leana Wen is in favor of COVID-19 vaccine mandates. "I don't think that people should have the choice to infect others with a potentially fatal and extremely contagious virus," she says. Wen is pictured above in the emergency department at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston on Aug. 14, 2012. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Think Of Your COVID-19 Vaccine Like A Very Good Raincoat, Says Dr. Leana Wen

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Subway riders mask up this month in New York City. Wearing masks in all kinds of indoor settings may be the safest way to slow the spread of the delta variant, many health experts say. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Urges Vaccinated People To Mask Up Indoors In Places With High Virus Transmission

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Mikkel and Kayla Kjelshus' daughter, Charlie, had a complication during delivery that caused her oxygen levels to drop and put her at risk for brain damage. Charlie needed seven days of neonatal intensive care, which resulted in a huge bill — $207,455 for the NICU alone — and confusion over which parent's insurer would cover the little girl's health costs. Christopher Smith for KHN hide caption

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Christopher Smith for KHN