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This building in Rafah, in southern Gaza, was destroyed by Israeli bombardment in December. amid continuing battles between Israel and Hamas. Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC has overhauled its COVID-19 isolation guidelines, saying the virus no longer represents the same threat to public health as it did several years ago. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Oprah Winfrey, pictured in January, said she will donate her stake in WeightWatchers and proceeds from any future stock options to the National Museum of African American History and Culture upon her departure from the company's board of directors. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

A prescription is filled on Jan. 6, 2023, in Morganton, N.C. A ransomware attack is disrupting pharmacies and hospitals nationwide this week. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Rohit Chopra, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is working toward regulation to remove medical bills from consumer credit reports. Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images

Why a financial regulator is going after health care debt

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A medical worker walks to enter Seoul National University Hospital in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

South Korea launches legal action to force striking doctors back to work

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Doctors in South Korea walk out in strike of work conditions

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Hundreds gather for a protest rally in support of in vitro fertilization legislation on Wednesday in Montgomery, Ala. Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP hide caption

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Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP

Hurricane Irene caused enormous damage in New York state, flooding homes like this one in Prattsville, NY, in 2011. Major weather events like Irene send people to the hospital and can even contribute to deaths for weeks after the storms. Monika Graff/Getty Images hide caption

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Monika Graff/Getty Images

A young, genetically modified pig raised at a Revivicor farm for organ transplantation research. Scott P. Yates for NPR hide caption

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Scott P. Yates for NPR

How genetically modified pigs could end the shortage of organs for transplants

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A dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine. When an unvaccinated person is exposed to measles, public health guidance if for them to get vaccinated within three days. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's response to measles outbreak troubles public health experts

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Janice Jernigans, 75, of St. Louis' Hyde Park neighborhood, signs a petition for a Missouri constitutional amendment that would legalize abortion up until fetal viability on Feb. 6 at The Pageant in St. Louis. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri advocates gather signatures for abortion legalization, but GOP hurdle looms

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Republican Arizona Senate candidate Kari Lake speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Saturday, Feb. 24. Lake has softened her stance on abortion as the campaign season moves forward. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Arizona, abortion politics are already playing out on the Senate campaign trail

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US Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) speaks during a news conference, on protections for access to in vitro fertilization. Last week the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that frozen embryos have the same rights as children and people can be held liable for destroying them. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Senator Tammy Duckworth says she has been trying to build bipartisan support for IVF access for years. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

After Alabama's ruling, this senator's bill aims to protect national access to IVF

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A 7-month-old child with diarrhea lies in a bed at a hospital in India. Oral rehydration salts are a cheap and effective treatment but are underused. A new study aims to find out why. Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images hide caption

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Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images