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Omar Mohamed, left, and his brother, Hassan. In the graphic memoir he coauthored, When Stars Are Scattered, Mohamed shares what their life was like in the refugee camps in Kenya — and their journey to resettlement in the U.S. Omar Mohamed hide caption

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Omar Mohamed

Workers from a Kellogg cereal plant picket along the main rail lines leading into the facility on Oct. 6 in Omaha, Neb. Workers have gone on strike after a breakdown in contract talks with company management. Grant Schulte/AP hide caption

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Grant Schulte/AP

A two-tier wage system roiled the auto industry. Workers today say no way

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A video call on a laptop screen during Christmas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidance on Friday for safely celebrating the upcoming holiday season. FilippoBacci/Getty Images hide caption

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FilippoBacci/Getty Images

Nurse Christina Garibay administers Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine to a man at a community outreach event in Los Angeles in August. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The Texas state Capitol is seen on Oct. 2. The Justice Department is suing over the state's restrictive abortion law and heading back to the Supreme Court to seek a halt to it while legal proceedings continue. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images hide caption

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Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

A doctor stands at a walk-up coronavirus testing site at West County Health Center in San Pablo, Calif., in April 2020. Pandemic burnout has affected thousands of health care workers. Jessica Christian/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Christian/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Images

A patient with tuberculosis waits to be seen by a doctor at the Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Annual deaths from the infectious disease are on the rise after years of progress. Michele Spatari /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Spatari /AFP via Getty Images

The vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. The White House says Thursday that the U.S. will commit 17 million additional doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to the African Union. Picture Alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I hide caption

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Picture Alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I

Women rights activists hold up signs as they gather in Washington, DC. to protest the new abortion law in Texas. While she was instrumental to the early abortion-rights movement, many in the crown may not have known the name Pat Maginnis. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

Patricia Maginnis, who was 93 when she died on August 30, may have been the first person to publicly call for abortion to be completely decriminalized in America. Despite her insistence on direct action on abortion-rights at a time when many were uncomfortable even saying the word "abortion," Maginnis is not a bold letter name of the movement. That may be because she didn't seek the limelight and she cared more for action then self-presentation.

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

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Scenes after heavy rainfall flooded a commuter parking lot in Reston, VA with some cars completely submerged. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im

The character Eric Effiong (portrayed by actor Ncuti Gatwa) is an openly gay British teen in the Netflix series Sex Education. In a storyline in the new season, Eric travels to his mother's homeland of Nigeria — where sex between men and sex between women are against the law — for a family wedding. Sam Taylor/Netflix hide caption

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Sam Taylor/Netflix

The No Surprises Act is intended to stop surprise medical bills. It could also slow the growth of health insurance premiums. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke's Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

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Kyle Green/AP

With hospitals crowded from COVID, 1 in 5 American families delays health care

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Janet Gerber, a health department worker in Louisville, Ky., processes boxes containing vials of the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine in March. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), speaks during a news conference on the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak in Geneva, in March 2020. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg via Getty Images