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Amit Sonawane, 35, an engineer at a district health office, gets his first vaccine dose in Palghar, India. Viraj Nayar for NPR hide caption

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Viraj Nayar for NPR

Will COVID-19 Vaccines Still Work Against The Variant From India?

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A man who is paralyzed was able to type with 95% accuracy by imagining that he was handwriting letters on a sheet of paper, a team reported in the journal Nature. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Man Who Is Paralyzed Communicates By Imagining Handwriting

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A Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine vial and syringe. An advisory panel to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine be administered to children ages 12 to 15. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster addresses reporters at a news conference last month in Columbia. McMaster issued a new mandate on Tuesday banning mask mandates and so-called vaccine passports. Jeffrey Collins/AP hide caption

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Jeffrey Collins/AP

Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

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People who need help getting to a vaccination site will be able to get free or discounted rides through Uber and Lyft, the White House says. Here, a woman receives her first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Aberdeen, Md., after getting a ride to the site from her landlord. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sydney Porter of Bellevue, Wash., receives her COVID-19 vaccination from Kristine Gill, with the Seattle Fire Department's Mobile Vaccination Teams, before the game between the Seattle Mariners and the Baltimore Orioles at T-Mobile Park on May 5 in Seattle. A late spring COVID-19 surge has filled hospitals in the metro areas around Seattle. Steph Chambers/Getty Images hide caption

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Steph Chambers/Getty Images

4th Wave Of COVID-19 Hospitalizations Hits Washington State

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Passengers, some wearing protective face coverings and some not, travel during rush hour on the London Underground last month. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

John Calhoun of Flathead County has diabetes and was convinced by an old friend to get vaccinated, through he suspects the coronavirus isn't as dangerous as health officials say it is. He's hoping vaccination will ease divisions over masking. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

A sign at Michigan State University directs people to a vaccination site. The university is one of an increasing number to require on-campus students to be vaccinated. Anna Nichols/AP hide caption

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Anna Nichols/AP

This 16-year-old got a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 shot late last month at the UCI Health Family Health Center in Anaheim, Calif. Students as young as 12 are now eligible to get the vaccine, too, the FDA says. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a press conference in Oakland, Calif., on Monday where he announced a new round of $600 stimulus checks residents making up to $75,000 a year. Newsom also announced a projected $75.7 billion budget surplus compared to last year's projected $54.3 billion shortfall. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Facing A Recall And A Massive Surplus, Gov. Newsom Proposes More Stimulus Checks

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A doctor prepares to administer a vaccine injection at New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital in Bronxville, N.Y., in January. The Food and Drug Administration has approved emergency use authorization of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for patients ages 12 to 15. Kevin Hagen/AP hide caption

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Kevin Hagen/AP

The Kindred Spirits sculpture in Midleton, County Cork, Ireland, pays tribute to a gift from the Choctaw nation to help during the 19th century potato famine. Ireland paid it back with donations to the Navajo and Hopi nations to help them during the pandemic. Gavin Sheridan hide caption

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Gavin Sheridan

The Biden administration says the government will protect gay and transgender people against sex discrimination in health care. In this 2017 photo, Equality March for Unity and Pride participants march past the White House in Washington. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

U.S. Will Protect Gay And Transgender People Against Discrimination In Health Care

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Alex Gibney's new documentary on HBO is called The Crime of the Century. It details the role of the medical system in creating the opioid crisis. HBO hide caption

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HBO

Opioid Crisis: Filmmaker Details The Medical System's 'Crime Of The Century'

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