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The FDA says one home test is not enough if you've been exposed to someone with COVID or are experiencing COVID-like symptoms. That initial negative ... could turn positive a day or two later. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Max Posner/NPR

This 2014 illustration made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention depicts a polio virus particle. Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove/CDC via AP hide caption

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Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove/CDC via AP

Reagan Gaona stands beside the Unfillable Chair memorial in front of Santa Fe High School in Texas. The memorial is dedicated to the eight students and two teachers killed in a May 2018 shooting. To the left is a sign displaying solidarity with Uvalde, Texas, a city that experienced a similar school shooting in May 2022. Renuka Rayasam/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Renuka Rayasam/Kaiser Health News

While the U.S. military has used burn pits in other conflicts, one expert says they were exceptionally large in Iraq and Afghanistan. Scott Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Nelson/Getty Images

What is the legacy of burn pits? For some Iraqis, it's a lifetime of problems

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laid out new guidance for the national response to COVID-19 on Thursday. Tami Chappell/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tami Chappell/AFP via Getty Images

With new guidance, CDC ends test-to-stay for schools and relaxes COVID rules

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A doctor checks chest x-rays of a tuberculosis patient at a clinic in Mumbai, India, that treats those with drug-resistant strains of the disease. Two new studies look at how drug resistance might be overcome. Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images

A room in a Planned Parenthood of Illinois clinic in Waukegan, where abortion providers from Wisconsin are helping to provide access to more patients from their home state now that abortion is nearly banned there. Manuel Martinez/WBEZ hide caption

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Manuel Martinez/WBEZ

Abortion is legal in Illinois. In Wisconsin, it's nearly banned. So clinics teamed up

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Only when the caller cannot or will not collaborate on a safety plan and the counselor feels the caller will harm themselves imminently should emergency services be called, according to the hotline's policy. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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d3sign/Getty Images

Social media posts warn people not to call 988. Here's what you need to know

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Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

A health worker gives a polio vaccine to a child in Karachi, Pakistan, on May 23. British health authorities on Wednesday said they will offer a polio booster dose to children aged 1 to 9 in London, after finding evidence the virus has been spreading in multiple regions of the capital. Fareed Khan/AP hide caption

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Fareed Khan/AP

Dr. Nicole Scott, the residency program director at Indiana's largest teaching hospital, is worried what the near-total ban on abortion in the state means for her hospital's ability to recruit and retain the best doctors. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

The monkeypox outbreak is growing in the U.S. and vaccines remain in short supply. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

With supplies low, FDA authorizes plan to stretch limited monkeypox vaccine doses

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