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Families May Be Apart For Thanksgiving This Year, But Connections Burn Bright

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"You do what you have to do to survive," says Diane Evans, who is fighting pandemic loneliness with technology. Evans lives in San Francisco and has Zoom calls regularly with her daughter in Chicago. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Germany extended its coronavirus lockdown measures through mid-December, after cases continued to surge in the country. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The Science Of Smell And Memory

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Performers dance along 34th Street during a pre-taping of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in front of the flagship store in New York City on Nov. 25. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Marine Capt. Cristian Alphonso, center, pictured with his parents, Bonny, left, and Karen, right, in 2014. Alphonso was unable to visit his parents before an upcoming deployment because of Defense Dept. travel restrictions. Courtesy Alphonso family hide caption

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Courtesy Alphonso family

Medical staff prepare for an intubation procedure on a COVID-19 patient in a Houston intensive care unit. In some parts of the U.S., as hospitals get crowded, hospital leaders are worried they may need to implement crisis standards of care. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Getty Images

A temporary tent was set up at UMass Memorial Hospital in Worcester, Mass., to prepare for an uptick in COVID-19 cases this month. Erin Clark/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Clark/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Donald Baffoni holds a 6-month-old turkey this month at Baffoni's Poultry Farm in Johnston, R.I. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Having A Group Thanksgiving? Here's How To Think About Safety

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Activists rally outside the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh in February in support of legislation for free period products. Scotland will make these products free to all who need them after lawmakers unanimously passed a bill that will require tampons and pads to be available in public places. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Public health officials around the country have been threatened and harassed for saying the best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is to wear a mask and not gather in large groups. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

Embattled Public Health Workers Leaving At 'Steady And Alarming' Rate

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A protester holds a sign to protest measures in Miami to close indoor seating amid a rise in coronavirus cases. The number of unemployment claims rose for a second week, reinforcing concerns about the economy. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The U.S. Capitol has been hit by the coronavirus like the rest of the country, grappling with protective measures and multiple cases. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Adam Woodrum and his son, Robert, get ready for a bike ride near their home in Carson City, Nev., this month. During the summer, Robert had a bike accident that resulted in a hefty bill from the family's insurer. Maggie Starbard for KHN hide caption

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Maggie Starbard for KHN

A Kid, A Minor Bike Accident And A $19,000 Medical Bill

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The Illinois Department of Veterans' Affairs, led by Linda Chapa LaVia, shown here in 2018, has ordered an independent investigation into a coronavirus outbreak at a veterans' home. John O'Connor/AP hide caption

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John O'Connor/AP
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As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

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France announced some COVID-19 restrictions will ease this week after the country passed the peak of the virus's second wave. Restaurants will remain closed until January. Nicolas Tucat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Tucat/AFP via Getty Images

A flu vaccine is administered at a walk-up COVID-19 testing site, in San Fernando, Calif. Emergency use authorization is expected soon for vaccines for COVID-19. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Ernest Grant, the president of the American Nurses Association, is taking part in a Moderna coronavirus vaccine trial. He says he wants to increase trust in science. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images

Black People Are More Hesitant About A Vaccine. A Leading Nurse Wants To Change That

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With new infections rising across the country, states are struggling to slow the spread, and testing can barely keep up. Here, people line up outside a coronavirus testing site this month in New York. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images