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Health

A glass is filled in with water on April 27, 2014 in Paris. Scientists studying what makes us thirsty have found the body checks in on our water consumption in several different ways. FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images

Thirsty? Here's how your brain answers that question

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People shop in The Galleria mall in Houston during Black Friday on Nov. 26, 2021. The economy grew strongly last year but at an uneven pace because of the pandemic. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Believe it or not, the economy grew last year at the fastest pace since 1984

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Peloton is a fitness and media company that makes stationary bikes, treadmills and workout videos. Peloton hide caption

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Peloton

This family photo shows D.J. Ferguson initially being treated at Milford, Mass., Regional Medical Center. Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston is defending itself after Ferguson's family claimed he was denied a new heart for refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Tracey Ferguson file photo/via AP hide caption

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Tracey Ferguson file photo/via AP

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell listens during his renomination hearing with the Senate Banking Committee on Jan. 11. The Fed is planning to become more aggressive in fighting inflation. Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Game time: The Fed unveils a tougher plan to fight stubbornly high inflation

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Brothers Chase Miller (left), 10, and Carson Miller, 11, in November 2021. The two brothers have a rare genetic disorder and are immunocompromised. Their family has to practice extreme caution to prevent coronavirus exposures. Danny Miller hide caption

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Danny Miller

There's one population that gets overlooked by an 'everyone will get COVID' mentality

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Elton John performs during his "Farewell Yellow Brick Road" tour on Jan. 19 in New Orleans. Despite being vaccinated and boosted, John has contracted COVID-19 and postponed two farewell concert dates in Dallas. John "is experiencing only mild symptoms," according to a statement. Derick Hingle/AP hide caption

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Derick Hingle/AP

Masked White Plains, N.Y., High School students walk between classes last year. A day after a judge overturned New York's mask mandate, an appellate judge temporarily restored it as the state prepares an appeal. Mark Lennihan/AP file photo hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP file photo

Linsey Jones, a medical assistant working at a drive-up coronavirus testing clinic, wears an N95 mask on Jan. 4 in Puyallup, Wash. The Biden administration will begin making 400 million N95 masks available for free to Americans starting this week. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Evusheld is a treatment authorized for prevention of COVID-19 in people who are seriously immunocompromised or who have had serious adverse reactions to COVID-19 vaccines. Peter Bostrom/AstraZeneca hide caption

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Peter Bostrom/AstraZeneca

Hospitals use a lottery to allocate scarce COVID drugs for the immunocompromised

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With its new COVID-19 vaccine, Pfizer and BioNTech are hoping to get ahead of worsening effects of omicron as well as any new variants. Jonas Roosens/Belga Mag/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonas Roosens/Belga Mag/AFP via Getty Images

A person visits a Covid-19 testing site along a Manhattan street in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A customer rests their head down while speaking with a Delta Airlines employee at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport on January 13, 2022 in Houston, Texas. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban tweeted of his new online pharmacy: "All drugs are priced at cost plus 15% ! Sign up and share your thoughts and experiences with us !" Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images

There are several ways older adults can get free rapid antigen tests, but Medicare will not reimburse them when they purchase them. Frederic J. Brown /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown /AFP via Getty Images

Dhaval Bhatt plays Monopoly with his children, Hridaya (left) and Martand, at their home in St. Peters, Missouri. Martand's mother took him to a children's hospital in April after he burned his hand, and the bill for the emergency room visit was more than $1,000 — even though the child was never seen by a doctor. Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News

The doctor didn't show up, but the hospital ER still billed $1,012

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