Health Health

Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

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Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

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Ruby Corado (left) with her friend and Casa Ruby board member Consuella Lopez on the porch of one of the transitional group homes Corado runs in Washington, D.C., in 2015. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR

Health Care System Fails Many Transgender Americans

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A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — including pulling the plug on a study it funded. Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Tell Us

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Nick Vargas talks with Dr. Kathryn Hall at The Source, an LGBT center in Visalia, Calif. Hall says that time and time again, her patients tell her they're afraid to come out to their other doctors. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

'Here It Goes': Coming Out To Your Doctor In Rural America

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Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or from a bone spur that can rub against a tendon. Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Popular Surgery To Ease Chronic Shoulder Pain Called Into Question

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U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, shown here testifying before a Senate committee in 2017, says President Trump's top health priority is addressing opioid addiction. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Says Working Together Is Key To Combating Opioid Crisis

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Supporters of women's health rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., March 23, 2016, as the Court hears oral arguments in seven cases dealing with religious organizations that want to ban contraceptives from their health insurance policies on religious grounds. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The "Miss Albinism" pageant was rescheduled due to the political uncertainty in Zimbabwe. From left: contestant Cindy Zikwature, Brenda Mudzimu, the founder of the pageant, and contestant Monalisa Manyati. Tendai Zvinavashe hide caption

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Tendai Zvinavashe

Emily Blair, a medical assistant at the Colon, Stomach and Liver Center in Lansdowne, Va., takes a blood pressure reading for Robert Koenen. New guidelines say that patients should have their arm resting on a surface while taking a reading and both feet should be placed flat on the ground. Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

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Josh Loock/NPR

Odds Are, They're Taking Your Blood Pressure All Wrong

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Lots of families fight over politics at the holiday table. But decisions about which foods to put on the table can whip up stress and squabbles, too. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

It's Not Just Politics. Food Can Stir Holiday Conflict, Too

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Out Of Bounds: From A Coma To 'Dancing With The Stars'

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In his new book, Dr. Aaron Carroll explains that there might be less evidence against some notoriously bad foods than we think. MHJ/Getty Images hide caption

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MHJ/Getty Images

'The Bad Food Bible' Says Your Eating Might Not Be So Sinful After All

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This is likely a pit toilet. The idea is that there's a giant hole underneath the toilet. It's from Revben and Havenes Banda's home in a rural village in Malawi. They live with their five children and five grandchildren; their monthly income is $50. Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street hide caption

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Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street