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Jamel Hill, a fourth year medical student, confronted a stark reality when he went into medical school. But through the racial microaggressions, he also found mentors who guided him through the hardest times. He just matched in a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency at the University of Kentucky. "It's a dream I've had since high school," he says. Farah Yousry hide caption

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Farah Yousry

A medical worker is seen at a quarantine center for Covid-19 coronavirus infected patients at a banquet hall, which was converted into an isolation center to handle the rising cases of infection in New Delhi, India. Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images hide caption

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Using fluorescent antibody-based stains and advanced microscopy, researchers are able to visualize cells of different species origins in an early stage chimeric embryo. The red color indicates the cells of human origin. Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology hide caption

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Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology

Scientists Create Early Embryos That Are Part Human, Part Monkey

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Diners eat lunch at Max's Oyster Bar in West Hartford, Conn., on March 19. Retail sales surged last month as $1,400 relief payments and easing coronavirus restrictions led shoppers to open their wallets. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Signs Of Economic Boom Emerge As Retail Sales Surge, Jobless Claims Hit Pandemic Low

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Hartsville, Tenn., resident Rick Bradley, 62, received his first COVID-19 vaccine dose in late March at a local Walgreens, saying, "This is not a summer cold or a conspiracy." He says some neighbors have become so used to COVID-19 that getting vaccinated has fallen off the priority list. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

'It's Not A Never Thing' — White, Rural Southerners Hesitant To Get COVID Vaccine

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Johnson & Johnson was mentioned roughly the same amount every hour online Tuesday as it was in entire weeks before news of the vaccine's pause, according to the tracking firm Zignal Labs. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Most Popular J&J Vaccine Story On Facebook? A Conspiracy Theorist Posted It

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Bottles of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson Janssen COVID-19 vaccine await transfer into syringes for administering in March in Los Angeles. The CDC had called on Tuesday for a pause in administering the vaccine. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, then commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, testifies during a House hearing on in October 2017. In an NPR interview, Gottlieb says he doesn't expect enough demand for the COVID-19 vaccine much beyond 160 million Americans. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Ex-FDA Chief Sees 'Struggle' To Vaccinate More Than Half U.S. Population

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Danish health authorities announced Wednesday that the country will continue its COVID-19 vaccine rollout without the shot made by AstraZeneca, citing its possible link to rare blood clotting events, the availability of other vaccines and the "fact that the COVID-19 epidemic in Denmark is currently under control." Dirk Waem/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dirk Waem/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Anike Baptiste receives a dose of J&J from nurse Mokgadi Malebye at a Pretoria hospital last February. South Africa is one of the countries that announced a pause on the J&J vaccine while more research is done into potential blood clots that occurred in younger women after getting the vaccine. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Tufts University became the first major university to strip the Sackler name from its buildings in 2019. Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Getty Images

Journalist Investigates 'Crime Story' Of The Sackler Family And The Opioid Crisis

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A Planned Parenthood of Utah facility in Salt Lake City. The Biden administration is moving to reverse a Trump-era family planning policy that critics describe as a domestic "gag rule" for reproductive healthcare providers. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Biden Administration Moves To Undo Trump Abortion Rules For Title X

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Syphilis cases in California have contributed to soaring national caseloads of sexually transmitted diseases. Experts point to the advent of dating apps, less condom use and an increase in meth. Wladimur Bulgar/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Wladimur Bulgar/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Once On The Brink Of Eradication, Syphilis Is Raging Again

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Jeff Zients, the White House COVID-19 response coordinator, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, brief reporters in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on Tuesday after two government agencies recommended a pause in the distribution of Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The J & J Pause, Explained — And What It Means For The U.S. Vaccination Effort

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Ezhil Arasi (left) and Ranjith Kumar. The pandemic kept her from her pregnancy checkups. Their baby was born with an intestinal blockage that required surgery and died during the procedure. Doctors told Ranjith that if his wife had been examined regularly during her pregnancy, there could have been a different outcome. Ranjith Kumar hide caption

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Ranjith Kumar

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended a pause in the use of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, shown here in a hospital in Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP