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In July, this Beijing payphone began ringing. Who was calling? Aowen Cao/NPR hide caption

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Aowen Cao/NPR

A public payphone in China began ringing and ringing. Who was calling?

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Planned Parenthood opened the Fairview Heights Health Center in Fairview Heights, Illinois, in 2019, anticipating a surge in patients from across the region. That surge is quickly materializing. ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

Planned Parenthood mobile clinic will take abortion to red-state borders

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Carla Claure's daughters prefer eating homemade meals at home than the "nasty" food served at school. Keren Carrión/NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrión/NPR

The hidden faces of hunger in America

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Participants tip buckets of ice water over their heads as they take part in the World Record Ice Bucket Challenge at Etihad Stadium on Aug. 22, 2014, in Melbourne, Australia. Scott Barbour/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Barbour/Getty Images

Gustavo Perez got his influenza vaccine from pharmacist Patricia Pernal in early September during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the city's Southwest Senior Center. This year's flu season may strike earlier and harder than usual, experts warn. A flu shot's your best protection. Scott Olson/ Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/ Getty Images

A controversial new drug for ALS that just received FDA approval could add months to patients' lives, but some scientists question whether it actually works. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

ALS drug's approval draws cheers from patients, questions from skeptics

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David Cave, a recovery coach who is part of an addiction specialty team at Salem Hospital, north of Boston, stands outside the emergency department. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Teammates gather around Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa (1) after an injury during the first half of an NFL football game against the Cincinnati Bengals, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022, in Cincinnati. Emilee Chinn/AP hide caption

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Emilee Chinn/AP

A fox walks near Upper Senate Park on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol on April 5. Multiple people reported being bitten by the fox, that later tested positive for rabies. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

After Frankie Cook's car accident on a wet road outside Rome, Ga., her father, Russell (right), got a lawyer's letter saying they owed a hospital emergency room more than $17,000 for scans and an exam to see if she had a concussion. Audra Melton for KHN hide caption

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Audra Melton for KHN

They were turned away from urgent care. The reason? Their car insurance

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This photograph, taken on February 24, 2014 during an aerial survey mission by Greenpeace in Indonesia, shows cleared trees in a forest located in the concession of Karya Makmur Abadi, which was being developed for a palm oil plantation. Environmental group Greenpeace on February 26 accused US consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble of aiding the destruction of Indonesian rainforests. BAY ISMOYO/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BAY ISMOYO/AFP via Getty Images

Illustration of an overactive bladder, a condition where there is a frequent feeling of needing to urinate, sometimes with loss of bladder control leading to urge incontinence. KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images hide caption

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KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images

Why The Bladder Is Number One!

When's the last time you thought about your bladder? We're going there today! In this Short Wave episode, Emily talks to bladder expert Dr. Indira Mysorekar about one of our stretchiest organs: how it can expand so much, the potential culprit behind recurrent urinary tract infections and the still-somewhat-mysterious link between the aging brain and the aging bladder.

Why The Bladder Is Number One!

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Katie Couric appears at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party on March 27 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Couric said Wednesday that she'd been diagnosed with breast cancer, and underwent surgery and radiation treatment this summer to treat the tumor. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Aerial view of downtown Fort Worth, Texas. Some hospitals in Texas and around the U.S. are seeing high profits, even as their bills force patients into debt. Of the nation's 20 most populous counties, none has a higher concentration of medical debt than Tarrant County, home to Fort Worth. Jupiterimages/Getty Images hide caption

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Jupiterimages/Getty Images