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Wellesley high schooler Andrew Song plays baritone sax in the jazz band. Craig LeMoult/GBH hide caption

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Craig LeMoult/GBH

With safety in mind, schools are getting their bands back together

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A water main break Wednesday left most residents of Benton Harbor, Mich., without water as the city continues to deal with lead pipe water quality issues. Don Campbell/The Herald-Palladium via AP hide caption

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Don Campbell/The Herald-Palladium via AP

Walmart is recalling about 3,900 bottles of Better Homes and Gardens-branded Essential Oil Infused Aromatherapy Room Spray with Gemstones in six different scents due to the possibility of a rare and dangerous bacteria discovered. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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Consumer Product Safety Commission

Lockdowns have been eased in the United Kingdom, but now there's a new variant called delta plus emerging. Will it take off the way delta did? Justin Setterfield/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Setterfield/Getty Images

People wonder if they should keep calm and carry on in the face of delta plus variant

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Pharmacist LaChandra McGowan prepares a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic operated by DePaul Community Health in New Orleans in August. Soon, children ages 5 to 11 could be eligible for Pfizer shots. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A major gathering of anti-vaccine activists will take place this weekend at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn. While the hotel, seen here, encourages guests to wear masks, they are not mandatory. Andrew Woodley/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Andrew Woodley/Education Images/Universal Image

While COVID still rages, anti-vaccine activists will gather for a big conference

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Expanded funds for in-home care can help seniors and disabled Americans stay in their homes. Here, Lidia Vilorio, a home health aide, gives her patient Martina Negron her medicine and crackers for her tea in May in Haverstraw, N.Y. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

In this photo illustration, a container of Johnson's baby powder sits on a table in 2019. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

J&J is using a bankruptcy maneuver to block lawsuits over baby powder cancer claims

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The Family Justice Center in Prince George's County was lit up purple in order to raise awareness of domestic violence in 2016 in Upper Marlboro, Md. Kate Patterson/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Kate Patterson/The Washington Post via Getty Im

Charged with capital murder, William George Davis listens to closing arguments in court on Oct. 19, 2021, in Tyler, Texas, as he stands trial for the deaths of four patients at Christus Trinity Mother Frances Hospital in Tyler in 2017 and 2018. Les Hassell/Longview News-Journal via AP hide caption

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Les Hassell/Longview News-Journal via AP

In between answering 911 calls, Jerrad Dinsmore (left) and Kevin LeCaptain perform a wellness check at the home of a woman in her nineties. The ambulance team in the small town of Waldoboro, Maine was already short-staffed. Then a team member quit recently, after the state mandated all health care workers get the COVID-19 vaccine. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

In Maine, a looming vaccine deadline for EMTs is stressing small-town ambulance crews

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Artist Jonas Never (@never1959) applies finishing touches to his mural of Sen. Bernie Sanders in Culver City, Calif., on Jan. 24. Standing out in a crowd of glamorously dressed guests, Sanders showed up for the presidential inauguration in a heavy winter jacket and patterned mittens — with an AFP photo of the veteran leftist spawning the first viral meme of the Biden era. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

A woman reacts as a health worker inoculates her during a vaccination drive against coronavirus inside a school in New Delhi Wednesday. India reached a milestone of administering a total of one billion doses against COVID-19. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

The Schuylkill River floods Philadelphia in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida in September. The extreme rain caught many by surprise, trapping people in basements and cars and killing dozens. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

A health care worker prepares a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during a clinic held at the Watts Juneteenth Street Fair in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Mitchell Joseph Valdes Sosa, the director of the Cuban Neurosciences Center, gives a press conference about symptoms reported by U.S. and Canadian diplomats in 2016 and 2017, commonly referred to as the "Havana Syndrome," in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Havana Syndrome: Over 200 Cases Documented Yet Cause Remains A Mystery

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Dan Wood/NPR

What to know about your risk of a serious or fatal breakthrough COVID infection

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