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Tony Johnson is chair of the Chinook Indian Nation, a federally unrecognized tribe. He stands on a Willapa Bay, Wash., beach, where he got married and not far from where his ancestors lived. Eilis O'Neill/KUOW hide caption

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Eilis O'Neill/KUOW

Unrecognized Tribes Struggle Without Federal Aid During Pandemic

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You can do a lot of things with minimal risk after being vaccinated. Although our public health expert says that maybe it's not quite time for a rave or other tightly packed events. Above: Fans take photographs of Megan Thee Stallion at a London show in 2019. Ollie Millington/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollie Millington/Getty Images

In an update on COVID-19 Wednesday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer discussed the state's efforts to expand the use of monoclonal antibody therapy to help those diagnosed with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. Michigan Office of the Governor/AP hide caption

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Michigan Office of the Governor/AP

Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Are A Cumbersome Tool Against Surges

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Lab assistant Tammy Brown dons personal protective equipment in a lab at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She works on preparing positive coronavirus tests for sequencing to discern variants rapidly spreading throughout the country. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In July, workers in the restaurant, food and alcohol industry took part in a nationwide protest against South Africa's liquor ban and other lockdown measures. Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

Why South Africa Banned Booze — And What Happened Next

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Ciera Amaro's art is one of the submissions to a project called Dispatches from Quarantine. Ciera Amaro via Alexandra Zapruder hide caption

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Ciera Amaro via Alexandra Zapruder

Dispatches From Quarantine: How Young People Are Documenting History

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Jamel Hill, a fourth year medical student, confronted a stark reality when he went into medical school. But through the racial microaggressions, he also found mentors who guided him through the hardest times. He just matched in a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency at the University of Kentucky. "It's a dream I've had since high school," he says. Farah Yousry/WFYI hide caption

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Farah Yousry/WFYI

A medical worker is seen at a quarantine center for Covid-19 coronavirus infected patients at a banquet hall, which was converted into an isolation center to handle the rising cases of infection in New Delhi, India. Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images hide caption

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Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images

Using fluorescent antibody-based stains and advanced microscopy, researchers are able to visualize cells of different species origins in an early stage chimeric embryo. The red color indicates the cells of human origin. Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology hide caption

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Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology

Scientists Create Early Embryos That Are Part Human, Part Monkey

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Diners eat lunch at Max's Oyster Bar in West Hartford, Conn., on March 19. Retail sales surged last month as $1,400 relief payments and easing coronavirus restrictions led shoppers to open their wallets. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Signs Of Economic Boom Emerge As Retail Sales Surge, Jobless Claims Hit Pandemic Low

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Hartsville, Tenn., resident Rick Bradley, 62, received his first COVID-19 vaccine dose in late March at a local Walgreens, saying, "This is not a summer cold or a conspiracy." He says some neighbors have become so used to COVID-19 that getting vaccinated has fallen off the priority list. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

'It's Not A Never Thing' — White, Rural Southerners Hesitant To Get COVID Vaccine

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Johnson & Johnson was mentioned roughly the same amount every hour online Tuesday as it was in entire weeks before news of the vaccine's pause, according to the tracking firm Zignal Labs. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Most Popular J&J Vaccine Story On Facebook? A Conspiracy Theorist Posted It

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Bottles of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson Janssen COVID-19 vaccine await transfer into syringes for administering in March in Los Angeles. The CDC had called on Tuesday for a pause in administering the vaccine. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, then commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, testifies during a House hearing on in October 2017. In an NPR interview, Gottlieb says he doesn't expect enough demand for the COVID-19 vaccine much beyond 160 million Americans. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Ex-FDA Chief Sees 'Struggle' To Vaccinate More Than Half U.S. Population

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Danish health authorities announced Wednesday that the country will continue its COVID-19 vaccine rollout without the shot made by AstraZeneca, citing its possible link to rare blood clotting events, the availability of other vaccines and the "fact that the COVID-19 epidemic in Denmark is currently under control." Dirk Waem/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dirk Waem/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Anike Baptiste receives a dose of J&J from nurse Mokgadi Malebye at a Pretoria hospital last February. South Africa is one of the countries that announced a pause on the J&J vaccine while more research is done into potential blood clots that occurred in younger women after getting the vaccine. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images