Health Health

Health

Dr. Anthony Fauci testifies last week in a House subcommittee hearing on the coronavirus. In an online forum Wednesday hosted by Harvard University, he shared that he has received death threats. Erin Scott/Pool via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Erin Scott/Pool via AP

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam speaks during a news conference in Richmond, Va. on June 4. Virginia has rolled out a smartphone app to automatically notify people if they might have been exposed to the coronavirus. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

A medical worker draws blood at a free coronavirus antibody testing event in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

FDA Adviser: Not Realistic To Expect A COVID-19 Vaccine In 2020

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/899411652/899438762" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A new study has found that parks in low-income and majority-nonwhite communities are smaller and serve a larger number of people per park acre. People are seen here relaxing in May in Brooklyn's Domino Park. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Connecticut Huskies coach Randy Edsall and his players will not be taking the field this fall. Citing "safety challenges," the school decided to cancel its 2020-21 football season. Michael Hickey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Hickey/Getty Images

Traffic makes its way into Manhattan over the Williamsburg Bridge in March 2019. New checkpoints at New York City's major bridges, tunnels and other sites are meant to drive home the message that 14-day quarantine rules are mandatory for people returning from states considered coronavirus hot spots. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mary Altaffer/AP

Nika Cotton recently opened Soulcentricitea in Kansas City, Mo. When public schools shut down in the spring, Cotton had no one to watch her young children who are 8 and 10. So she quit her job in social work — and lost her health insurance — in order to start her own business. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Smith/KCUR

Tom Brady of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers works out in Tampa, Fla., on Tuesday. The NFL is doing daily coronavirus testing for the first two weeks of training. Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

NFL's Top Doctor On How Football Plans To Return

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/898920731/899230784" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Six states have an agreement to acquire fast-result antigen tests for the coronavirus. Here, a medical worker collects a sample after a patient self-administers a nasal swab test. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

Some 1,892 American flags are installed on the National Mall in Washington, DC in 2014. The Iraq and Afghanistan veterans installed the flags to represent the 1,892 veterans and service members who committed suicide this year as part of the "We've Got Your Back: IAVA's Campaign to Combat Suicide." Jewel Samad / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jewel Samad / AFP via Getty Images

Farmers work during a harvest in Jutland, Denmark. People keep worrying about food shortages. Some economists say the fears actually create their own problems. Nick Brundle Photography/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nick Brundle Photography/Getty Images

Food Is Growing More Plentiful, So Why Do People Keep Warning Of Shortages?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/897804434/899060906" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thousands of couples have been separated by pandemic-related travel restrictions. Lots of them are unmarried. Johannes Mahele and Joresa Blount; Corsi Crumple and Sean Donovan; Todd Alsup and Sebastian Pinde hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Mahele and Joresa Blount; Corsi Crumple and Sean Donovan; Todd Alsup and Sebastian Pinde

Can Love Conquer Travel Bans? Couples Divided By Pandemic Are Rallying To Reunite

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/897656373/898673567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Hundreds of nursing home residents have been transferred as a result of their facilities treating COVID-19 patients only. Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images

A mid-April sign in Philadelphia reminds passersby that current social distancing measures are for their own good. Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images