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Health

In 2016, dozens of people associated with the U.S. Embassy in Havana began reporting symptoms of what became known as "Havana syndrome." Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba

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A grocery store in New York City advertises that it accepts food stamps. A Trump administration proposal could result in 3 million people losing their food assistance. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The same steep growth and use of big data that attracted venture capital cash to companies that administer Medicare Advantage plans have led to scrutiny of the companies by government officials. Federal audits estimate such plans nationwide have overcharged taxpayers nearly $10 billion annually. 123light/Getty Images hide caption

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123light/Getty Images

In 2012, this mother carried her 5-year-old son to a malaria clinic in Thailand from Myanmar. Two new studies find that multidrug-resistant parasites are rendering front-line malaria drugs ineffective in Southeast Asia. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Study: Malaria Drugs Are Failing At An 'Alarming' Rate In Southeast Asia

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(From left) Sam Adamson, Lori Riddle, Hailey Hardcastle, and Derek Evans pose at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem. The teens suggested legislation to allow students to take "mental health days" as they would sick days. Jessica Adamson/AP hide caption

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Jessica Adamson/AP

Steve Wickham, at home in Grundy County, Tenn., has developed an educational seminar with his wife, and fellow nurse, Karen, that they are using to help people with Type II diabetes bring blood sugar under control with less reliance on drugs. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

2 Nurses In Tennessee Preach 'Diabetes Reversal'

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Sovereign Valentine and his wife, Jessica, wait as a dialysis machine filters his blood. Before finding a dialysis clinic in their insurance network, the Valentines were charged more than a half-million dollars for 14 weeks of treatment. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

First Came Kidney Failure. Then There Was The $540,842 Bill For Dialysis

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The belief that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

We all walk around the world thinking of ourselves as individuals. But in this short animation, NPR's Invisibilia explores some of the ways in which we're all invisibly connected to one another. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Oil production platforms on Venezuela's Lake Maracaibo. Venezuela sits on some of the largest oil reserves in the world. John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images

The Fallout From A Seemingly Sweet Oil Deal For Venezuela's Neighbors

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Beyond 'Good' Vs. 'Bad' Touch: 4 Lessons To Help Prevent Child Sexual Abuse

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Opponents running to Joe Biden's left say his health plan for America merely "tinkers around the edges" of the Affordable Care Act. But a close read reveals some initiatives in Biden's plan that are so expansive they might have trouble passing even a Congress held by Democrats. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Flames and smoke emerge from the Philadelphia Energy Solutions refinery in Philadelphia on June 21. Experts say the explosions could have been far more devastating if deadly hydrogen fluoride had been released. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Choosing a surgeon can be tricky. It starts with making sure you really need the surgery, and then finding an experienced specialist you can trust. Morsa Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Morsa Images/Getty Images

Acting Chief of Customs and Border Protection Mark Morgan says he doesn't expect the asylum rule announced this week to be in place for very long. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Shuran Huang/NPR

Acting Head Of Customs And Border Protection Says New Asylum Rule In 'Pilot' Phase

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Nationally, drug overdose deaths reached record levels in 2017, when a group protested in New York City on Overdose Awareness Day on August 31. Deaths appear to have declined slightly in 2018, based on provisional numbers, but nearly 68,000 people still died. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A federally funded study is testing aerobic exercise as a way to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease. Stewart Cohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stewart Cohen/Getty Images

Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?

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