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A COVID-19 antiviral pill called molnupiravir from Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics is being considered by the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use in the coronavirus pandemic. Merck & Co Inc./Handout via Reuters hide caption

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Merck & Co Inc./Handout via Reuters

Dr. Mehmet Oz, seen here in a December 2019 file photo, joins the Republican field of possible candidates aiming to capture Pennsylvania's open U.S. Senate seat in next year's election. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Dutch health authorities say they've identified early cases of the new omicron variant of the coronavirus — including one from a sample taken the week before South Africa raised the alarm about the mutated variant. Other cases were found through tests at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam. Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa in August. He called on Western nations on Sunday to scrap travel restrictions placed on southern Africa to stem the spread of the omicron variant. "The prohibition of travel is not informed by science nor will it be effective in preventing the spread of this variant," he said. Tobias Schwarz/Reuters hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/Reuters

A man receives a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa, on Monday. The omicron variant, first identified in South Africa, has now spread to at least a dozen other countries. Denis Farrell/AP hide caption

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Denis Farrell/AP

Why some researchers think the omicron variant could be the most infectious one yet

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Molnupiravir, an antiviral drug to treat mild to moderate COVID-19, is under consideration by the FDA for possible authorization. Merck hide caption

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Merck

New antiviral drugs are coming for COVID. Here's what you need to know

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Sol Cotti for NPR

How to decide if freezing your eggs is right for you — and how to get started

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Travelers exit the International Arrivals area at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Virginia, on Monday. The Biden administration is banning travel for non-U.S. citizens from several African countries over concerns about the omicron variant. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

A person prepares to administer a Pfizer COVID vaccine at a clinic in Ferguson, Missouri in August 2021. Merriam-Webster has chosen "vaccine" as the word of the year, citing a sustained surge in lookups. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Anthony Fauci (right), director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to the president, speaks alongside President Biden following a meeting of the COVID-19 response team at the White House on Monday. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

People step off a tram in Nottingham, England, a city where a case of the omicron variant of the coronavirus was identified last week. Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images

(from left) Kevin Dedner founded Hurdle, a mental health startup that pairs patients with therapists. Ashlee Wisdom's company, Health in Her Hue, connects women of color with culturally sensitive medical providers. Nathan Pelzer's Clinify Health analyzes data to help doctors identify at-risk patients in underserved areas. Erica Plybeah's firm, MedHaul, arranges transport to medical appointments. Kevin Dedner; Kolin Mendez Photography; Aaron Gang Photography; Starboard & Port Creative hide caption

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Kevin Dedner; Kolin Mendez Photography; Aaron Gang Photography; Starboard & Port Creative

Even doing a few simple tasks can be draining for Semhar Fisseha after her COVID diagnosis. Helena Kubicka de Bragança hide caption

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Helena Kubicka de Bragança

For patients with long COVID, chronic fatigue syndrome may offer a guiding star

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A healthcare worker inoculates 59 year-old Raymon Diaz with a dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine during a vaccination campaign as part of the "Noche de San Juan" festivities in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

People line up to get on the Air France flight to Paris at OR Tambo's airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Friday. The United States, Israel and other European nations have already imposed travel restrictions on South Africa and other nations in the region. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

President Biden speaks to media as he arrives on Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., on Sunday after returning from Nantucket, Mass., after spending the Thanksgiving holiday there. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Following the discovery of a new COVID-19 variant, the United Kingdom imposed new restrictions on arriving travelers from South Africa and other southern African countries. The U.S. is implementing similar restrictions starting Monday. Hollie Adams/Getty Images hide caption

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Hollie Adams/Getty Images

On November 29, the World Health Organization will convene a virtual summit for its member states to consider the handling of future outbreaks. Pictured above: WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The WHO is seeking a new treaty on handling future pandemics. It could be a hard sell

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