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Molnupiravir, an antiviral drug to treat mild to moderate COVID-19, is under consideration by the FDA for possible authorization. Merck hide caption

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Merck

One of the Home Bed assist handles recalled by Drive DeVilbiss Healthcare. The company is recalling both its Bed Assist Handles and Bed Assist Rail after two deaths were reported. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Demonstrators rally against laws the limit access to abortion at the Texas State Capitol on October 2, 2021 in Austin, Texas. The Women's March and other groups organized marches across the country to protest a new abortion law in Texas. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images hide caption

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Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

Prescribing abortion pills online or mailing them in Texas can now land you in jail

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Norwegian Cruise Lines confirmed 10 cases among Norwegian Breakaway passengers and crew members on Saturday, and then seven more on Sunday, according to the Louisiana Department of Health. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Michigan-based Alexander & Hornung is recalling 234,391 pounds of fully cooked ham and pepperoni products. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service is asking customers to throw the products away or return them to their place of purchase. U.S. Department Of Agriculture Food Safety And Inspection Service hide caption

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U.S. Department Of Agriculture Food Safety And Inspection Service

In October, Eric Trump, son of the former president, spoke to a conference filled with anti-vaccine activists. Screenshot by NPR/Bitchute hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/Bitchute

Inside the growing alliance between anti-vaccine activists and pro-Trump Republicans

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Pro-Trump counties now have far higher COVID death rates. Misinformation is to blame

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Margarita Ahuanari, left, and Karina Ahuanari look at posters of their mother. The images were placed where they think she was buried at the mass grave that was later renamed the COVID-19 Cemetery in Iquitos. Angela Ponce for NPR hide caption

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Angela Ponce for NPR

A mass COVID grave in Peru has left families bereft — and fighting for reburial

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

With omicron looming over the holidays, here's how to stay safe

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Meric Long of the Bay Area band The Dodos found his voice in a distinctive guitar style. While writing the new album Grizzly Peak, he watched that ability begin to slip away. Shane Tolentino for NPR hide caption

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Shane Tolentino for NPR

A 3D-generated image of the coronavirus variant of concern known as omicron. The little bumps are spike proteins (see definition below). Uma Shankar Sharma/Getty Images hide caption

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Uma Shankar Sharma/Getty Images

Kenesha Kirk Siegler for NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler for NPR

Thriving Black-owned businesses 'righting the wrongs of the past' in rural Mississippi

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The Glorietta Mall in Makati City in metro Manila was transformed into a mass vaccination site on December 1 during a government-sponsored campaign to increase the number of people vaccinated across the country. Ella Mage/NPR hide caption

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Ella Mage/NPR

The Philippines vaccinated 7.6 million people in 3 days. Duterte demands even more

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This photo shows a tunnel inside the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 2018. The state of Hawaii says a laboratory has detected petroleum product in a water sample from an elementary school near Pearl Harbor. The news comes amid heightened concerns that fuel from the massive Navy storage facility may contaminate Oahu's water supply. AP hide caption

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AP

A commuter walks past information boards displayed to remind the public about how to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus in Seoul on Wednesday. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Restaurants, like this McDonald's in Miami Beach, Fla., have been big engines of job growth. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Hiring slowed sharply in November, even before omicron, with 210,000 jobs added

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Scientists at Pfizer's research and development laboratories in Groton, Conn., worked on the COVID-19 pill called Paxlovid. Stew Milne/AP hide caption

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Stew Milne/AP

How Pfizer developed a COVID pill in record time

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Leslie Clayton, a physician assistant in Minnesota, says a name change for her profession is long overdue. "We don't assist," she says. "We provide care as part of a team." Liam James Doyle for KHN hide caption

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Liam James Doyle for KHN