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People with disabilities worry about how they will be disproportionately affected by the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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People line up outside of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on June 23, as the city makes vaccines available to residents possibly exposed to monkeypox. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Monkeypox outbreak in U.S. is bigger than the CDC reports. Testing is 'abysmal'

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Whole Woman's Health of Minnesota, a clinic that opened to patients in February, is one of only eight that provide abortions in the state and is located just a few minutes from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Christina Saint Louis/KHN hide caption

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Abortion rights demonstrator Elizabeth White leads a chant in response to the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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A patient talks with a nurse at a traveling contraception clinic in Madagascar run by MSI Reproductive Choices, an organization that provides contraception and safe abortion services in 37 countries. The group condemned the overturn of Roe v. Wade and warned that the ruling could stymie abortion access overseas. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

A slew of companies will cover travel expenses for employees that have to travel out of their state for an abortion after the Supreme Court overturned federal protections for the procedure. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Anti-abortion activists rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 6. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, ending right to abortion upheld for decades

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Fanny Sung (left) and her younger sister, Marianne Sung (right). Abortion — and whether to get one — changed the two sisters' lives in ways that affected them for years to come. Paige Pfleger/WPLN News hide caption

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Paige Pfleger/WPLN News

Two sisters got pregnant young. Their choices and their secrets shaped their lives

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Aerial view of the Beckton Sewage Treatment Works in London. Between February and May, U.K. scientists found several samples containing closely related versions of the polio virus in wastewater at the plant. mwmbwls/Flickr hide caption

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There are a number of initiatives in the works to address PFAS in drinking water. ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP via Getty Images

PFAS 'forever chemicals' are everywhere. Here's what you should know about them

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The FDA hopes that a new limit on nicotine levels in cigarettes will help people stop smoking or avoid the habit altogether. Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

A mother holds her 1-year-old son as he receives the child Covid-19 vaccine in his thigh at Temple Beth Shalom in Needham, Mass., on June 21, 2022. The temple was one of the first sites in the state to offer vaccinations to anyone in the public. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Minerva Contreras, 44, connects climate change to her health because she has a lung problem that makes it harder to breathe on hot days. Keeping her house near Bakersfield, Calif., cool costs as much as $800 a month in the summer. Molly Peterson/KVPR hide caption

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Americans connect extreme heat and climate change to their health, a survey finds

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K-9 Officer Teddy Santos watches Huntah as she checks a classroom at Freetown Elementary School. If she detects COVID, she will sit. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

'Smell Ya Later, COVID!' How Dogs Are Helping Schools Stay COVID-free

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South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, seen here in 2020, recently signed the state's Medical Ethics and Diversity Act into law. It lets medical practitioners refuse nonemergency care that conflicts with their religious, moral or ethical beliefs, such as family planning or end-of-life care. Critics say the law permits discrimination, especially against LGBTQ people. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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S.C. law lets health care providers refuse nonemergency care based on beliefs

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Leonard Leo, Co-Chairman of the Federalist Society, played a key role in building the Supreme Court's current 6-3 conservative majority. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Meet The Man Who Helped Build The Court That May Overturn Roe

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