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Face coverings are seen on display in Los Angeles on July 2. California Gov. Gavin Newsom threatened this week to withhold up to $2.5 billion in aid to local police departments that refuse to enforce mask rules and other pandemic-related mandates. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

More States Require Masks In Public As COVID-19 Spreads, But Enforcement Lags

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Police in the southern New South Wales border city of Albury check cars crossing the state border from Victoria on July 7 as authorities close the border due to an outbreak of COVID-19 in Victoria. Australia ordered millions of people locked down to combat a surge in coronavirus cases, as nations across the world scrambled to stop the rampaging pandemic. William West/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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William West/AFP via Getty Images

Ideas For Reopening Schools; Evidence Of Airborne Spread

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses a news conference last month in Chelsea, Quebec. David Kawai/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Kawai/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Florida's education commissioner has ordered the state's schools to reopen for in-person instruction in the fall, subject to the advice and orders from health authorities. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Israeli security forces control access to a neighborhood that has been isolated following an increase in coronavirus cases in the southern coastal city of Ashdod last week. Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, shown here in 2019, says a headache is her only symptom after testing positive for the coronavirus. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has repeatedly doubted the severity of the virus since it first found a foothold in Brazil, reportedly in late February. Andressa Anholete/Getty Images hide caption

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Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

A researcher at Peking University's Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics conducts tests on May 14. Scientists are confronting their biases and learning to engage with science from places they're unfamiliar with. Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images

The Pandemic Is Pushing Scientists To Rethink How They Read Research Papers

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The Boston salon where Vincent Cox works has reopened, and the 65-year-old is back at work. "It's been one of the hardest things I've ever done in my life," he says. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

'Almost In Tears': A Hairstylist Worries About Reopening Too Soon

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In 2009, Australia's deadliest bushfires on record destroyed Kinglake, a town just over an hour's drive northeast of Melbourne. The disaster had long-term effects on families. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego, pictured March 3 at City Hall in Phoenix, says the city needs more help responding to the coronavirus. Anita Snow/AP hide caption

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Anita Snow/AP

Phoenix Mayor Says The City Is In A 'Crisis Situation,' Needs Help

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New South Wales health officials interview passengers as they arrive from a Qantas flight that flew from Melbourne at Sydney Airport in July. James D. Morgan/Getty Images hide caption

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James D. Morgan/Getty Images

Students move out of dormitories at San Diego State University in March, after the university cancelled the rest of the semester and has asked students to move out within 48 hours. Nine percent of young adults say they've moved due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

A healthcare worker looks out from a window in the door to the COVID-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas, July 2. Despite its renowned medical center with the largest agglomeration of hospitals and research laboratories in the world, Houston is on the verge of being overwhelmed by cases of coronavirus exploding in Texas. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Lawsuit Forces Release of Government Data On Racial Inequity Of Coronavirus

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