Health Health

Health

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, shown here in 2019, says a headache is her only symptom after testing positive for the coronavirus. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, seen during a ceremony last month in Brasilia, has announced his coronavirus test results. Andressa Anholete/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

A researcher at Peking University's Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics conducts tests on May 14. Scientists are confronting their biases and learning to engage with science from places they're unfamiliar with. Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images

The Boston salon where Vincent Cox works has reopened, and the 65-year-old is back at work. "It's been one of the hardest things I've ever done in my life," he says. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Arnold/NPR

'Almost In Tears': A Hairstylist Worries About Reopening Too Soon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/880997491/887733742" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In 2009, Australia's deadliest bushfires on record destroyed Kinglake, a town just over an hour's drive northeast of Melbourne. The disaster had long-term effects on families. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego, pictured March 3 at City Hall in Phoenix, says the city needs more help responding to the coronavirus. Anita Snow/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Anita Snow/AP

Phoenix Mayor Says The City Is In A 'Crisis Situation,' Needs Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/887925764/887925765" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New South Wales health officials interview passengers as they arrive from a Qantas flight that flew from Melbourne at Sydney Airport in July. James D. Morgan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
James D. Morgan/Getty Images

Students move out of dormitories at San Diego State University in March, after the university cancelled the rest of the semester and has asked students to move out within 48 hours. Nine percent of young adults say they've moved due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

A healthcare worker looks out from a window in the door to the COVID-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas, July 2. Despite its renowned medical center with the largest agglomeration of hospitals and research laboratories in the world, Houston is on the verge of being overwhelmed by cases of coronavirus exploding in Texas. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Lawsuit Forces Release of Government Data On Racial Inequity Of Coronavirus

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/887556843/887993750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Visitors wearing face masks wait to see the Mona Lisa at the Louvre Museum on Monday. The most visited museum in the world reopened to the public after closing in March. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chesnot/Getty Images

"We don't have a whole lot of options that don't involve risking our lives," says New Orleans resident Lauren Van Netta, who has asthma and other health issues. Lauren Van Netta hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Van Netta

'We Need Help': People At Higher Coronavirus Risk Fear Losing Federal Unemployment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/887046279/887925799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

London's Lyceum Theatre is wrapped in pink tape bearing the words "Missing Live Theatre," part of a campaign by a group of British stage designers. Keith Mayhew/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Keith Mayhew/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

It wasn't easy in early March to get a test in the U.S. confirming you had the coronavirus — scarce availability of tests meant patients had to meet strict criteria linked to a narrow set of symptoms and particular travel history. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

Specimens collected from multiple people can be combined into one batch to test for the coronavirus. A negative result would clear all the specimens. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nati Harnik/AP

Pooling Coronavirus Tests Can Spare Scarce Supplies, But There's A Catch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/886886255/887540687" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript