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An American flag flew at half-mast at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts last spring, when dozens of veterans died at the facility. Two of its leaders are now facing criminal neglect charges over their handling of a COVID-19 outbreak. Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, here during a news conference last month, says his state is ready to respond if a surge of coronavirus infections emerges. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

An illegal roadside graveyard in northeastern Namibia. People in the townships surrounding Rundu, a town on the border to Angola, are too poor to afford a funeral plot at the municipal graveyard — and resorted to burying their dead next to a dusty gravel road just outside of the town. Brigitte Weidlich/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brigitte Weidlich/AFP via Getty Images

Sing Sing Correctional Facility in Ossining, N.Y. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

For Inmates With COVID-19, Anxiety and Isolation Make Prison 'Like A Torture Chamber'

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The clock is ticking for tens of thousands of pilots, flight attendants, reservation agents and other airline employees, who will likely lose their jobs on Oct. 1 if Congress doesn't extend federal aid for the airlines. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Thousands Of Airline Workers Facing Unemployment As Aid Package Stalls In Congress

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Matthew Fentress was diagnosed with heart disease that developed after a bout of the flu in 2014. His condition worsened three years later, and he had to declare bankruptcy when he couldn't afford his medical bills, despite having insurance. Meg Vogel for KHN hide caption

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Meg Vogel for KHN

Heart Disease Bankrupted Him Once. Now He Faces Another $10,000 Medical Bill

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A pregnant woman waits in line for groceries at a food pantry in Waltham, Mass., during the coronavirus pandemic. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Data Begin To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

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The Taj Mahal reopened to visitors on Monday in a symbolic business-as-usual gesture even as India looks set to overtake the U.S. as the global leader in coronavirus infections. Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

How Countries Around The World Are Coping With New Surge In Coronavirus Cases

India is poised to overtake the U.S. as the country with the most COVID-19 cases. This week the Taj Mahal reopened to tourists for the first time in more than six months. NPR correspondent Lauren Frayer reports on how that's not an indication that the pandemic there has subsided.

How Countries Around The World Are Coping With New Surge In Coronavirus Cases

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Many people who normally take on jobs as poll workers are in higher-risk groups for the coronavirus, leading to fears of a widespread shortage of poll workers. Here, New York City Board of Election employees and volunteers help voters at the Brooklyn Museum polling site during the New York Democratic presidential primary in June. Angel Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angel Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, pictured at a news conference earlier this month, said Thursday that "we're going to put together our own review committee headed by the Department of Health." Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

United Airlines baggage tags are displayed on a table at San Francisco International Airport. The carrier says it's starting a pilot program next month that will offer rapid coronavirus testing at the airport or via a self-collected, mail-in test ahead of a flight. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Nurses clap after Kym Villamer and her colleague Dawn Jones sing "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" at New York-Presbyterian Queens Hospital's new COVID-19 ward. Robert Gonzales hide caption

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Robert Gonzales

Family Ordeal Catapults A Young Filipina To The U.S. — And The Pandemic Front Lines

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African Americans and other underrepresented minorities make up only about 5% of the people in genetics research studies. janiecbros/Getty Images hide caption

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janiecbros/Getty Images

Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It

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Dutch YouTube star turned model and singer Famke Louise performs on stage during a live show on television in the Netherlands. Famke Louise has come under fire recently for saying she would no longer participate in public campaigns to combat COVID-19. Paul Bergen/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bergen/Redferns/Getty Images

Halloween is one more thing being upended by the pandemic. Federal guidelines advise against traditional trick or treating, but parents across the country are trying to make the holiday special for their children anyway. Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images