Health Health

Health

Boxes containing the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the company's Janssen Pharmaceuticals unit, are shown at a vaccination center in Los Angeles last week. Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Medicare Advantage, a fast-growing private alternative to original Medicare, has enrolled more than 26 million people. Humana Inc. is one of the largest of these insurers. While popular with seniors, Medicare Advantage has been the target of multiple government investigations. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Climate activist Greta Thunberg, 18, is adding vaccine inequality to her agenda. In a speech on Monday, she said it was "unethical" to vaccinate young people in rich countries when health workers in low resource countries aren't yet inoculated. WHO/Screengrab by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
WHO/Screengrab by NPR

A member of the U.S. Armed Forces administers a COVID-19 vaccine at a FEMA community vaccination center on March 2 in Philadelphia. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Makela/Getty Images

With All U.S. Adults Eligible, How Can More Be Convinced To Get Vaccinated?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/988177519/988854008" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Eating Less Meat Helps The Environment. Here Are Recipes To Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985307478/988251877" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A nurse administers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at a Veterans Administration Long Beach Healthcare System pop-up vaccination site at the Dae Hueng Presbyterian Church on Saturday in Gardena, Calif. More than half of U.S. adults have now received at least one vaccine dose. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Abraar Karan spent time in rural India in 2008 while working for Unite for Sight, a nonprofit group that provides eye care. Above: He interviews a woman about the challenge of living from severe cataracts. Daniel Carvalho hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Carvalho

People wait for their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a government hospital in Chennai, India, on Friday. Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images

What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/988302407/988309590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tony Johnson is chair of the Chinook Indian Nation, a federally unrecognized tribe. He stands on a Willapa Bay, Wash., beach, where he got married and not far from where his ancestors lived. Eilis O'Neill/KUOW hide caption

toggle caption
Eilis O'Neill/KUOW

Unrecognized Tribes Struggle Without Federal Aid During Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/988123599/988223091" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

You can do a lot of things with minimal risk after being vaccinated. Although our public health expert says that maybe it's not quite time for a rave or other tightly packed events. Above: Fans take photographs of Megan Thee Stallion at a London show in 2019. Ollie Millington/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ollie Millington/Getty Images

In an update on COVID-19 Wednesday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer discussed the state's efforts to expand the use of monoclonal antibody therapy to help those diagnosed with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. Michigan Office of the Governor/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michigan Office of the Governor/AP

Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Are A Cumbersome Tool Against Surges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/987751235/987822741" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lab assistant Tammy Brown dons personal protective equipment in a lab at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She works on preparing positive coronavirus tests for sequencing to discern variants rapidly spreading throughout the country. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In July, workers in the restaurant, food and alcohol industry took part in a nationwide protest against South Africa's liquor ban and other lockdown measures. Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

Why South Africa Banned Booze — And What Happened Next

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/987399442/987401019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ciera Amaro's art is one of the submissions to a project called Dispatches from Quarantine. Ciera Amaro via Alexandra Zapruder hide caption

toggle caption
Ciera Amaro via Alexandra Zapruder

Dispatches From Quarantine: How Young People Are Documenting History

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986927761/987956467" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript