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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP
Sarah Gonzales for NPR

The Importance Of Mourning Losses (Even When They Seem Small)

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An American flag flies outside of Houston Methodist Hospital in June 2020. A federal judge has thrown out a lawsuit by hospital employees who have refused to comply with a mandate requiring they receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Mark Forrest is back fishing after rehabilitation with the IpsiHand device helped him regain use of his right hand. Mark Forrest hide caption

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Mark Forrest

New Device Taps Brain Signals To Help Stroke Patients Regain Hand Function

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A March 21 attack by the Assad regime forces and Iran-backed terrorist groups targeted a hospital in Aleppo, killing six civilians and injuring 15. Above: A view of the damaged site. Kasim Rammah/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Kasim Rammah/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Dr. Aaron Kesselheim (left), a professor at Harvard Medical School, at a documentary film screening in 2018 in Boston. He has resigned from a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel over the FDA's decision to approve an Alzheimer's drug. Scott Eisen/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation hide caption

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Scott Eisen/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation
Alyson Hurt/NPR

States Scale Back Pandemic Reporting, Stirring Alarm

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Poverty and disability are linked to lower vaccination rates in some rural communities. The Vaccination Transportation Initiative sponsored van helps rural residents get the COVID-19 vaccine in rural Mississippi. The effort works to overcome the lack of transportation and access to technology for rural residents. Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Manas Ray and his mother in 2019, the last time he was in India. Manus Ray hide caption

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Manus Ray

His Mom Was Sick In India During The Second Wave. He Wrote A Poem About It — And Hope

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Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, wants answers from one of the country's largest owners of single-family rental homes. A report from an advocacy group finds that the company has been filing evictions at more than four times the rate in predominantly Black counties as in mostly white counties. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A new federal rule requires hospitals and other high-risk health care settings to implement COVID-19 safety measures, including providing personal protective equipment to workers, ensuring proper ventilation and giving workers paid time off to get vaccinated. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The Houston Methodist hospital system says 178 employees now have until June 21 to complete their COVID-19 vaccinations, or they could be fired. Most of the system's roughly 26,000 employees have complied with the requirement. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Signs on a screen are shown before an athletics test event for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games last month at the National Stadium in Tokyo. Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japan Aims To Convince A Wary Public The Olympics Will Be Safe

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