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Wegovy has been called "a major breakthrough" given how well it works to reduce body weight. But the injection drug is extremely expensive and when people can't afford to stay on it, they experience rebound weight gain that's hard to stop. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Wegovy works. But here's what happens if you can't afford to keep taking the drug

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Brenna Kearney plays with her daughter, Joey, at home in Chicago. When Kearney was pregnant, she developed a rare type of preeclampsia and had to undergo an emergency cesarean section. Joey was discharged after a 36-day stay in the NICU. Taylor Glascock for KHN hide caption

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Taylor Glascock for KHN

A baby spent 36 days at an in-network hospital. Why did her parents get a huge bill?

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Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR

What kind of perfectionist are you? Take this 7-question quiz to find out

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On Jan. 23, 2020, as the coronavirus spread in China, residents of Wuhan, where it was first identified, donned masks to go shopping. The U.S. didn't officially endorse masks as a preventive measure for the public for a number of weeks. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/Getty Images

Prairie voles mate for life and are frequently used to study human behavior. Todd H. Ahern/Emory University hide caption

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Todd H. Ahern/Emory University

Can you bond without the 'love hormone'? These cuddly rodents show it's possible

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U.S. Attorney Markenzy Lapointe speaks at a news conference in Miami on Wednesday about a network of nursing school operators, centered in South Florida, who allowed students to buy diplomas without the proper training. D.A. Varela/Miami Herald via AP hide caption

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D.A. Varela/Miami Herald via AP

More than 30 years ago, Johnnie Haire, grounds supervisor at Sunset Gardens of Memory cemetery in Millstadt, Illinois, set up a birdbath and purchased angel figurines for a special garden for deceased children called "Baby Land." He carefully painted each angel a hue of brown. He says he wanted the angels to be Black, like many of the children laid to rest here. Cara Anthony/KHN hide caption

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Cara Anthony/KHN

When gun violence ends young lives, these men prepare the graves

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This image shows purified particles of mpox virus, formerly called monkeypox. Viruses like these can be genetically altered in the lab in ways that might make them more dangerous. NIAID hide caption

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NIAID

When is it OK to make germs worse in a lab? It's a more relevant question than ever

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A nurse prepares a syringe of a COVID-19 vaccine at an inoculation station in Jackson, Miss., in 2022. An advisory committee for the FDA voted Thursday to simplify the country's approach to COVID vaccination. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP
Joy Ho for NPR

Your kids are adorable germ vectors. Here's how often they get your household sick

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Festival volunteer Erin Petrey pours nonalcoholic martinis during bartender Derek Brown's master class at the Mindful Drinking Fest in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 21. Keren Carrión/NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrión/NPR

This drinks festival doesn't have alcohol. That's why hundreds of people came

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Gel nail polish is popular for its durability, but needs to dry under a UV light. A new study raises questions about the potential health risks of those devices. StockPlanets/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

As an emergency physician at Western Health, in Melbourne, Australia, Dr. Andy Tagg says he meets a lot of anxious parents whose children have swallowed Lego pieces. Much like Andy so many years ago, the vast majority of kids simply pass the object through their stool within a day or so. But Andy and five other pediatricians wondered, is there a way to give parents extra reassurance ... through science?

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

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