Health Health

"I am frustrated that despite all of our efforts, we haven't been able to identify the cause of this mystery illness," said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images

Drug addiction is a big concern to rural Americans, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Alice Goldfarb/NPR hide caption

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Alice Goldfarb/NPR

NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic

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President Trump listens in January as Stephen Ubl, president and CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (second from left), introduces himself during a meeting at the White House. The sky-high prices of some drugs are a big issue for some voters this fall. Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images

Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

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According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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Shared scooters and bicycles are spreading to several major U.S. cities while policymakers are scrambling to find ways to ensure that riders are safe. David Paul Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Getty Images

As E-Scooters Roll Into American Cities, So Do Safety Concerns

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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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David Vetter plays in the enclosed plastic environment that he had to stay in to survive. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Opinion: The Doctor And 'The Boy In The Bubble'

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Allagash employees Salim Raal, left, and Brendan McKay stack bottles of Golden Brett, a limited release beer fermented with a house strain of Brettanomyces yeast. The Maine brewery recently installed solar panels as part of its sustainability initiatives. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

A 12-year-old Iranian refugee girl, who had tried to set herself on fire with petrol, rests in a bed in Nauru, where nearly 1,000 refugees and asylum seekers have been sent by the government of Australia. Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images

DNA sleuthing helped identify Joseph James DeAngelo, the suspected East Area Rapist, who was arraigned in a Sacramento, Calif., courtroom in April. Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns

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A 291-day-old retina. Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process, which could help accelerate efforts to cure colorblindness and lead to new treatments for diseases. Johns Hopkins University hide caption

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Johns Hopkins University

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision

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As Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, campaigns for re-election, he has warned that 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions could lose health coverage. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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