Health Health

When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

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A homeless man in Denver draws heroin into a syringe. Treatment centers in the city say patterns of drug use seem to be changing. While most users once relied on a single drug — typically painkillers or heroin or cocaine — an increasing number now also use meth. Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

A Surge In Meth Use In Colorado Complicates Opioid Recovery

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Aaron Yoder is training for the world championships for backward running, or retrorunning, in Bologna, Italy. Greg Echlin/KCUR hide caption

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Greg Echlin/KCUR

This Coach Wants To Be The Next World Champion In Backward Running

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A drug user prepares a hit of heroin inside VANDU's supervised injection room. Rafal Gerszak for NPR hide caption

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Rafal Gerszak for NPR

Watchful Eyes: At Peer-Run Injection Sites, Drug Users Help Each Other Stay Safe

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According to MarketWatch, Johnson & Johnson "has been fighting more than 9,000 talcum-powder lawsuits with mixed success. It says its signature powder has always been safe and asbestos-free." Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Abortion Rights Groups Prepare For Intensified Battle At The State Level

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Time outdoors leaves you vulnerable to tick bites and the diseases they can transmit. New research seeks to a better picture of the geographic spread of ticks that carry dangerous pathogens. Ascent/PKS Media Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Ascent/PKS Media Inc. via Getty Images

A foal nurses from a mare at the Lindenhof Stud in Brandenburg, Germany. While mare's milk remains a niche product, its reputation as a health elixir is causing trouble for European producers in a more regulated age. Susanna Forrest/for NPR hide caption

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Susanna Forrest/for NPR

At safe injection sites like Insite, in Vancouver, Canada, drug users can inject drugs under the watch of trained medical staff who will help in case of overdose. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Cities Planning Supervised Drug Injection Sites Fear Justice Department Reaction

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Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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A new study finds certain drugs that can boost the immune system show promise for developing anti-aging treatments in the future. David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Experimental Drugs Boost Elderly Immune Systems, Raising Hopes For Anti-Aging Effects

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Tens of thousands of people live in villages on the edge of the Ankeniheny-Zahamena Corridor rainforest in Madagascar. A government policy now bans cutting down trees to get more land for farming. Mahesh Poudyal hide caption

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Mahesh Poudyal

Research shows that people taken to an emergency room after a suicide attempt are at high risk of another attempt in the next several months. But providing them with a simple "safety plan" before discharge reduced that risk by as much as 50 percent. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images