Health Health

Health workers marched in Butembo on Wednesday to protest the violence they're facing. The demonstration comes in the wake of an attack last Friday in which an epidemiologist from Cameroon was shot and killed. Al-hadji Kudra Maliro/AP hide caption

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Al-hadji Kudra Maliro/AP

Why Health Workers In The Ebola Hot Zone Are Threatening To Strike

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A man uses heroin in a park in New York City in 2017. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Majority Of Americans Say Drug Companies Should Be Held Responsible For Opioid Crisis

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'Mind Fixers' Documents The 'Troubled Search' For Mental Illness Medication

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Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk

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President Trump To Speak At Opioid Abuse Summit In Atlanta

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In Massachusetts last July, several Franklin County Jail inmates were watched by a nurse and a corrections officer after receiving their daily doses of buprenorphine, a drug that helps control opioid cravings. By some estimates, at least half to two-thirds of today's U.S. jail population has a substance use or dependence problem. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

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Former Rochester Drug Co-Operative CEO Laurence Doud III, who faces criminal charges stemming from the opioid crisis, leaves the federal courthouse in Manhattan on Tuesday. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Rochester Drug Cooperative Faces Federal Criminal Charges Over Role In Opioid Epidemic

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World's First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

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How do you tell the good parenting advice from the bad? When producer Selena Simmons-Duffin's daughter was ready to start solid food, her parents encountered wildly conflicting advice about what to feed her. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Drowning In Parenting Advice? Here's Some Advice For That

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Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung of Cameroon was killed on Friday in an attack on an Ebola response command center in Democratic Republic of the Congo. DRC Ministry of Health & WHO hide caption

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DRC Ministry of Health & WHO

The Doctor Killed In Friday's Ebola Attack Was Dedicated — But Also Afraid

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Sergio, a Guatemalan migrant, recently visited a mobile medical van with his 2-year-old son, Dylan. Sergio thinks his son became sick in a holding facility, where they spent two days. Mallory Falk/KRWG hide caption

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Mallory Falk/KRWG

At The U.S.-Mexico Border, Volunteer Medics Step In To Care For Migrants

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Over the past decade, hospitals have been rapidly building outpatient clinics or purchasing existing independent ones. It was a lucrative business strategy because such clinics could charge higher rates, on the premise that they were part of a hospital. Medicare's recent rule change puts a damper on all that. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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