Health Health

Mental Health Experts Warn About Impacts New Regulations Could Have On Migrant Children

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753493947/753493948" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone, before graduating to heroin, which is cheaper. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Tales Of Corporate Painkiller Pushing: 'The Death Rates Just Soared'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753114950/753461186" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An FDA contract worker collects food and supplies from a food pantry in Baltimore. In the face of a Trump administration proposal that could cause 3 million people to lose federal food assistance, mayors from 70 cities are pushing back. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Researchers in Nigeria are participating in an African effort to develop a biobank that reflects the rich genetic diversity of Africa. Yann Arthus-Bertrand/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yann Arthus-Bertrand/Getty Images

Lack Of Diversity In Genetic Databases Hampers Research

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/752890414/753493989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gianpiero Palermo, a professor of embryology at Weill Cornell Medicine, runs the lab where scientists are trying to use CRISPR to edit genes in human sperm. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elias Williams for NPR

Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/746321083/753359129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Addiction Clinics Market Unproven Infusion Treatments To Desperate Patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741115178/753337585" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A water sample taken from the Mediterranean Sea as part of a scientific study about microplastics damaging marine ecosystems on the French Riviera in 2018. In a new study, the WHO says that microplastics are "ubiquitous." Eric Gaillard/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gaillard/Reuters

According to the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll exercise, including stretching and yoga, is popular among younger people as a way to relieve pain. Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Naked mole rats are eusocial, which means they live all crowded together, in a colony underground. Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source

Astrocyte cells like these from the brain of a mouse may differ subtly from those in a human brain. David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753121107/753493995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ride-Hailing Revolution Leaves Some People With Disabilities Behind

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753034337/753036318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A pile of debris including all kinds of plastics grows hourly at Omni Recycling, a materials recovery facility in Pitman, N.J. Plastic bags are especially problematic because they can get caught in the conveyor belts and equipment and gum up the recycling process. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rebecca Davis/NPR

More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/751524877/753169402" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">