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How do you tell the good parenting advice from the bad? When producer Selena Simmons-Duffin's daughter was ready to start solid food, her parents encountered wildly conflicting advice about what to feed her. Selena Simons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simons-Duffin/NPR

Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung of Cameroon, who was killed on Friday in the attack on an Ebola response command center in Democratic Republic of the Congo. DRC Ministry of Health & WHO hide caption

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DRC Ministry of Health & WHO

The Doctor Killed In Friday's Ebola Attack Was Dedicated ... But Also Afraid

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Sergio, a Guatemalan migrant, recently visited a mobile medical van with his 2-year-old son, Dylan. Sergio thinks his son became sick in a holding facility, where they spent two days. Mallory Falk/KRWG hide caption

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Mallory Falk/KRWG

At The U.S.-Mexico Border, Volunteer Medics Step In To Care For Migrants

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Over the past decade, hospitals have been rapidly building outpatient clinics or purchasing existing independent ones. It was a lucrative business strategy because such clinics could charge higher rates, on the premise that they were part of a hospital. Medicare's recent rule change puts a damper on all that. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Google is looking to artificial intelligence as a way to make a mark in health care. Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Google Searches For Ways To Put Artificial Intelligence To Use In Health Care

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When is a snore just annoying and when is it a sign of sleep apnea? Luckily, they sound pretty different. Aleksandra Shutova / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Aleksandra Shutova / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Beyond Annoying: How To Identify The Sounds Of A Troublesome Snore

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Parts of the Cape Fear River near Fayetteville, N.C., are contaminated with a PFAS compound called GenX. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services is surveying residents in the area about their health. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS

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Amid Rural Doctor Shortage, Dozens Of Medical Workers Charged In Opioid Crackdown

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The Massachusetts Alcohol and Substance Abuse Center in Plymouth houses men for court-mandated addiction treatment. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Prison For Forced Addiction Treatment? A Parent's 'Last Resort' Has Consequences

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Gail Gray suffers from degenerative disk disease and takes daily painkillers. Her pharmacist was arrested in a recent federal justice department sting. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Amid Opioid Prescriber Crackdown, Health Officials Reach Out To Pain Patients

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he was spurred to act because of an "unprecedented spike" in the number of teenagers who were vaping, or smoking e-cigarettes. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Jaclyn Schildkraut, associate professor of Criminal Justice at SUNY Oswego, leads a lockdown drill at Ed Smith Elementary School in Syracuse, N.Y., last month. Heather Ainsworth/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Heather Ainsworth/Colorado Public Radio

The habit of ordering unneeded tests and treatments drives up medical costs. It's a pattern doctors often learn in medical school and residency. Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images hide caption

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Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images