Health Health

Union members picket a Stop & Shop in Dorchester, Mass., prior to the arrival of former Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

The Washington state Senate passed a bill on Wednesday that would remove the personal belief exemption from the required vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella. Here, people protest the related house bill outside Washington's Legislative Building in Olympia in February. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Heather Martin (left) was a student at Columbine High School in 1999. She met Sherrie Lawson, who worked at the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard in 2013 during the shooting there, through Martin's support organization, the Rebels Project. Nathaniel Minor/CPR hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/CPR

The out-of-pocket expense of mammograms, MRIs and other tests and treatments can be several thousand dollars each year when you have a high-deductible health policy. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

David Vetter, pictured in September 1982 inside part of the bubble environment that was his protective home until he died in 1984. Today most kids born with severe combined immunodeficiency are successfully treated with bone marrow transplants, but researchers think gene therapy is the future. AP hide caption

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AP

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease

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The image on the left shows the brains of pigs that were untreated for 10 hours after death, with neurons appearing as green, astrocytes as red and cell nuclei as blue. The image on the right shows cells in the same area of brains that, four hours after death, were hooked up to a system that the Yale University researchers call BrainEx. Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine hide caption

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Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine

Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs

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A nurse prepares the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in Haverstraw, N.Y., earlier this month. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Brigham Young University alumna Sidney Draughon (center) flew in from New York to join a protest against the Honor Code Office. Kelsie Moore/KUER hide caption

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Kelsie Moore/KUER

A Rare Sight At Brigham Young University As Students Protest The Honor Code Office

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What's Behind The Increase Of Measles Cases In The U.S.

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Paradise Irrigation District manager Kevin Phillips shows a sample of the town's water pipes, which were frequently woven between underground root systems that were likely burned during the fire. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Paradise, Calif., Water Is Contaminated But Residents Are Moving Back Anyway

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A large new study finds mixed results for the effectiveness of programs aimed at motivating healthful behavior — such as more exercise and better nutrition — among employees. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

CRISPR gene-editing technology allows scientists to make highly precise modifications to DNA. The technology is now starting to be used in human trials to treat several diseases in the U.S. Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

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Health Officials Warn The Measles Outbreak Is Accelerating

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News Brief: Notre Dame Fire, Democrats' Tax Returns, Measles Outbreak

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A nurse prepares the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in Haverstraw, N.Y. Several measles outbreaks in New York state are contributing to this year's unusually high measles rates. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Measles Outbreak 'Accelerates,' Health Officials Warn

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