Health Health

The Massachusetts Alcohol and Substance Abuse Center in Plymouth houses men for court-mandated addiction treatment. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Prison For Forced Addiction Treatment? A Parent's 'Last Resort' Has Consequences

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Gail Gray suffers from degenerative disk disease and takes daily painkillers. Her pharmacist was arrested in a recent federal justice department sting. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Amid Opioid Prescriber Crackdown, Health Officials Reach Out To Pain Patients

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he was spurred to act because of an "unprecedented spike" in the number of teenagers who were vaping, or smoking e-cigarettes. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Jaclyn Schildkraut, associate professor of Criminal Justice at SUNY Oswego, leads a lockdown drill at Ed Smith Elementary School in Syracuse, N.Y., last month. Heather Ainsworth/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Heather Ainsworth/Colorado Public Radio

The habit of ordering unneeded tests and treatments drives up medical costs. It's a pattern doctors often learn in medical school and residency. Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images hide caption

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Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images

Some detainees at the Karnes County Residential Center in Karnes City, Texas, went on a hunger strike last year. There have been at least six hunger strikes at detention centers in the first three months of 2019 alone. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Hunger Strikes At ICE Detention Centers Spread As Parole, Bond Are Denied

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A Brooklyn judge on Thursday upheld a mandatory measles vaccinations order. On the same day, the United Talmudical Academy, pictured here, reopened after being closed for failing to comply with a Health Department order that required it to provide medical and attendance records amid a measles outbreak. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Union members picket a Stop & Shop in Dorchester, Mass., prior to the arrival of former Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

The Washington state Senate passed a bill on Wednesday that would remove the personal belief exemption from the required vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella. Here, people protest the related house bill outside Washington's Legislative Building in Olympia in February. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

The out-of-pocket expense of mammograms, MRIs and other tests and treatments can be several thousand dollars each year when you have a high-deductible health policy. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Heather Martin (left) was a student at Columbine High School in 1999. She met Sherrie Lawson, who worked at the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard in 2013 during the shooting there, through Martin's support organization, the Rebels Project. Nathaniel Minor/CPR hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/CPR

After Columbine, An Unlikely Friendship Bound By The Trauma Of Mass Shootings

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David Vetter, pictured in September 1982 inside part of the bubble environment that was his protective home until he died in 1984. Today most kids born with severe combined immunodeficiency are successfully treated with bone marrow transplants, but researchers think gene therapy is the future. AP hide caption

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AP

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease

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The image on the left shows the brains of pigs that were untreated for 10 hours after death, with neurons appearing as green, astrocytes as red and cell nuclei as blue. The image on the right shows cells in the same area of brains that, four hours after death, were hooked up to a system that the Yale University researchers call BrainEx. Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine hide caption

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Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine

Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs

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