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History

The US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 14, 2019, is seen following a snowstorm. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

'Barely Treading Water': Why The Shutdown Disproportionately Affects Black Americans

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Then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich gestures toward President Bill Clinton, as then-Senate GOP leader Bob Dole sits to the right. They met to try to work through the government shutdown in late 1995 to early 1996. Greg Gibson/AP hide caption

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Greg Gibson/AP

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(From left) Lake County, Fla., Sheriff Willis McCall and an unidentified man stand next to Walter Irvin, Samuel Shepherd and Charles Greenlee. The three were accused of rape in 1949, along with a fourth man. They were all pardoned Friday. State Library and Archives of Florida via AP hide caption

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State Library and Archives of Florida via AP

A protestor holds up a poster depicting Mumia Abu-Jamal during a demonstration outside the offices of District Attorney Larry Krasner, Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Philadelphia. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Then-President Richard Nixon and Vice President Spiro Agnew wave to the crowd at the Republican National Convention in 1972. Agnew would resign a year later. AP hide caption

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AP

'Bad Behavior By People In High Office': Rachel Maddow On The Lessons Of Spiro Agnew

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October 1789: American Gen. George Washington declining to accept terms, after the siege of Yorktown, from British Gen. Charles Cornwallis (left), whose subsequent surrender practically ended the American War of Independence. Three Lions/Getty Images hide caption

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Three Lions/Getty Images

A bag to collect forensic evidence is seen as the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner hosts a demonstration of technology that allows them to test degraded DNA samples. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

Using Genetic Genealogy To Identify Unknown Crime Victims, Sometimes Decades Later

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Political activist Angela Davis speaks onstage at the National Museum Of African American History and Culture last year in Washington, D.C. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images

President Harry S. Truman speaks during a television address from the Oval Office in 1947. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Trump Opts For Gravitas Of The Oval Office As He's In Need Of A Game-Changing Moment

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Stacya Shepard thought she knew her dad. But that changed one day with a phone call from a stranger. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr /Photo courtesy of Stacya Shepard Silverman hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr /Photo courtesy of Stacya Shepard Silverman

The Cowboy Philosopher: A Tale Of Obsession, Scams, And Family

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American civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, pictured in 1964, as spokesman for the Citywide Committee for Integration, at the organization's headquarters, Silcam Presbyterian Church in New York City. Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images

In Newly Found Audio, A Forgotten Civil Rights Leader Says Coming Out 'Was An Absolute Necessity'

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