History History

History

Engraved portrait of George Clinton, a former U.S. vice president who was also New York state's first and longest-serving governor, in the late 18th century — not long after the first sign of the word gubernatorial appeared in the English language. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Where Does The Term 'Gubernatorial' Come From?

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Anna Wiese, 11, stands in front of a plaque in the state Capitol building commemorating Idaho's first female legislators. She originally found the plaque tucked away in a forgotten corner last year and wrote a letter to get it moved. James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio

Idaho's 1st Female Lawmakers Properly Honored Thanks To 11-Year-Old Student

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The Kaaba in the centre of the Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, 1979. Every year, millions of Muslims complete a Hajj, or pilgrimage, to this sacred spot. Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Liliana Segre waves at the end of a meeting with students in Milan, Italy, in 2018. For decades, Segre, 89, was reluctant to discuss her time in the Auschwitz concentration camp. But in the 1990s, she began speaking to schoolchildren throughout Italy about the Holocaust. Luca Bruno/AP hide caption

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Luca Bruno/AP

Italian Holocaust Survivor Faces Threats After Calling For Investigation Into Hate

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An artistic rendering of the retreat of Hernán Cortés from Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital, in 1520. The Spanish conquistador led an expedition to present-day Mexico, landing in 1519. Although the Spanish forces numbered some 500 men, they managed to capture Aztec Emperor Montezuma II. The city later revolted, forcing Cortés and his men to retreat. Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images

500 Years Later, The Spanish Conquest Of Mexico Is Still Being Debated

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People march along the Mississippi River levee in Louisiana on Friday as they perform in a reenactment of the 1811 German Coast Uprising. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Hundreds March In Reenactment Of A Historic, But Long Forgotten Slave Rebellion

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The Berlin Wall went up almost overnight in 1961; in November 1989, it began to crumble. Ullstein Bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Ullstein Bild via Getty Images

Opinion: 30 Years After The Berlin Wall

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David Hasselhoff performs during a concert in Berlin on Oct. 3 — Germany Unity Day. In 1989, his song "Looking for Freedom" was the anthem to many Germans' newfound freedom. Frank Hoensch/Getty Images hide caption

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Frank Hoensch/Getty Images

David Hasselhoff Is Still Big In Germany 30 Years After His Berlin Wall Show

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Augustine of Hippo was among those in the Catholic Church who championed its eventual rejection of intrafamily marriages, which researchers say may have paved the way for a breakdown of extended family networks in Western Europe. Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images

A child plays near communist-era apartment blocks in Hoyerswerda, Germany. After the collapse of the communist East German government that had redeveloped the area into an industrial hub, factories shut down and coal production declined. The population has sunk below 33,000 — about half its size before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In German Coal Country, This Former Socialist Model City Has Shrunk In Half

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Kurdish Peshmerga fighters occupy a hilltop observation post originally built by Iraqi forces, May 12, 1979. Alex Bowie/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Bowie/Getty Images

No Friend But The Mountains

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Detail of cover of Mobituaries by Mo Rocca Emily Shur/Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Emily Shur/Simon & Schuster

In 'Mobituaries,' Mo Rocca Gives People The Second Send-Offs They Deserved

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