History History

Depression-Era Photos Make A Mark In American Photography

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Employees of the U.S. Radium Corp. paint numbers on the faces of wristwatches using dangerous radioactive paint. Dozens of women, known as "radium girls," later died of radium poisoning. One of the last radium girls died this year at 107. Argonne National Laboratory hide caption

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Argonne National Laboratory

Mae Keane, One Of The Last 'Radium Girls,' Dies At 107

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Great Dismal Swamp, in Virginia and North Carolina, was once thought to be haunted. For generations of escaped slaves, says archaeologist Dan Sayers, the swamp was a haven. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Fleeing To Dismal Swamp, Slaves And Outcasts Found Freedom

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New York Public Library

Before The Internet, Librarians Would 'Answer Everything' — And Still Do

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Common plays James Bevel, Tessa Thompson plays Diane Nash, Lorraine Toussaint plays Amelia Boynton and Andre Holland plays Andrew Young in Ava DuVernay's Selma. Atsushi Nishijima/Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Atsushi Nishijima/Paramount Pictures

For Hollywood, 'Selma' Is A New Kind Of Civil Rights Story

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An Iraqi Christian prays inside a shrine on the grounds of the Mazar Mar Eillia Catholic Church in Irbil, in northern Iraq. Irbil has become home to hundreds of Iraqi Christians who fled their homes as the Islamic State advanced earlier this year. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

With Each New Upheaval In Iraq, More Minorities Flee

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An illustration depicts Jesus Christ transforming water into wine during the wedding at Cana (John 2:7). Joseph Martin Kronheim/Kean Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Martin Kronheim/Kean Collection/Getty Images

What Would Jesus Drink? A Class Exploring Ancient Wines Asks

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Romania's Rush To Judge Ceausescu Haunts Retired General

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British and German soldiers fraternizing at Ploegsteert, Belgium, on Christmas Day 1914. World War I was raging at the time, but front-line troops initiated the truce, which they documented in photos and letters. Commanders on both sides were furious when they learned of it. Courtesy of Imperial War Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Imperial War Museum

A Century Ago, When The Guns Fell Silent On Christmas

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Australian Christmas today is characterized by gastronomic eclecticism. Many of us have abandoned the old British customs — except for the rich and alcoholic Christmas pudding. Edward Shaw/iStockphoto hide caption

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Edward Shaw/iStockphoto

David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King Jr. and Carmen Ejogo as Coretta Scott King in the new movie Selma. Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Paramount Pictures

A Vital Chapter Of American History On Film In 'Selma'

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Martha McCullough shows off a photo of her grandfather, Christmas Moultrie, who was born on the Mulberry Grove Plantation before Gen. Sherman's army burned it down ahead of the capture of Savannah in 1864. Both McCullough and Hugh Golson, a descendant of the plantation's owner, knew Moultrie as children. Carl Elmore/Courtesy Savannah Morning News hide caption

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Carl Elmore/Courtesy Savannah Morning News

Bound By A Plantation, Two Georgians Remember A Special Christmas

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'The Interview' Is Not The First Film To Rile A Government

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