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Malachi Kirby and Emayatzy Corinealdi in the new production of Roots. Steve Dietl hide caption

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Steve Dietl

A Modern 'Roots' For An American Society Still 'Based On The Color Line'

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Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell speaks in front of the Stonewall Inn in 2014 to announce a National Park Service initiative to identify historic sites related to the struggle for LGBT rights. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Long A Symbol, Stonewall Inn May Soon Become Monument To LGBT Rights

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'Roots' Remake: Your Take

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The King Of Zydeco, The Supremes, Merle Haggard Among Recordings Joining Library Of Congress

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Sen. Barack Obama, as Democratic presidential candidate, and former candidate Sen. Hillary Clinton appear together at a Women For Obama fundraiser New York, July, 2008. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Is Primary Rivalry Making The Democratic Party Stronger Like It Did In 2008?

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Obama Makes Historic Visit To Hiroshima

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Survivors of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare are seen as they await emergency medical treatment in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945. AP hide caption

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AP

After Hiroshima Bombing, Survivors Sorted Through The Horror

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society

Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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30 Years Ago, 6 Million People Held Hands Across America

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Demonstrators gather in a silent rally to mourn the death of an Okinawa woman in front of Camp Zukeran on May 22. The crime is thrusting the opposition to the U.S. presence on Okinawa back in the spotlight. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

As President Visits Japan, Okinawa Controversy Is Back In The Limelight

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Angie Wang for NPR

My 'Oriental' Father: On The Words We Use To Describe Ourselves

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Patricia Gallagher (from left), who first proposed the tasting; wine merchant Steven Spurrier; and influential French wine editor Odette Kahn. After the results were announced, Kahn is said to have demanded her scorecard back. "She wanted to make sure that the world didn't know what her scores were," says George Taber, the only journalist present that day. Courtesy of Bella Spurrier hide caption

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Courtesy of Bella Spurrier

The Judgment Of Paris: The Blind Taste Test That Decanted The Wine World

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Chinese and other Asian beer brands on display at a supermarket. An ancient brewery discovered in China's Central Plain shows the Chinese were making barley beer with fairly advanced techniques some 5,000 years ago. Chris/Flickr hide caption

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Chris/Flickr

A man crosses a bridge over the Poudre River, in Fort Collins, Colo. The picturesque river is the latest prize in the West's water wars, where wilderness advocates usually line up against urban and industrial development. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP