History History

Ruth Bonner, Who Helped Open Smithsonian African-American Museum, Dies At 100

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A blue tent covers a British World War II bomb that was found during construction. Disposal operations are set for Sunday and require what's expected to be Germany's biggest evacuation since the war. Boris Roessler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris Roessler/AFP/Getty Images

A recent scuffle between an elotero and a pedestrian in Hollywood re-energized discussion about legalizing street vending in California. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

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The Library of Congress is home to The Alexander Hamilton Papers — a collection of 12,000 items. You can view the documents online. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

I Saved Every Letter You Wrote Me: The Library of Congress Digitizes Hamilton

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Baltimore removed four statues with Confederate ties on Aug. 16 under the cover of darkness, in a five-hour operation ordered by Mayor Catherine Pugh. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

Baltimore Took Down Confederate Monuments. Now It Has To Decide What To Do With Them

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Matthew Johnson, the current resident of Wadada's childhood home, gives Wadada his Mother's old bible.

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A statue depicting Confederate Gen. and former Georgia Gov. John Brown Gordon on horseback outside the Georgia Statehouse in Atlanta earlier this month. Gordon was also reputed to be a leader of the Ku Klux Klan. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

The History Of The Presidential Pardon

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A man runs from a line of charging police in riot gear in Baltimore. The photo, taken by Devin Allen, is featured in the National Museum of African American History and Culture's newest exhibit, "More Than A Picture." Gift of Devin Allen/Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture hide caption

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Gift of Devin Allen/Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

In 'More Than A Picture' Exhibit, History Happens Now

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Rethinking Controversial Monuments

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El Corrido de Boyle Heights, or The Ballad of Boyle Heights, was painted in 1983 by the East Los Streetscapers, an artist collective that painted a number of murals across Los Angeles' Boyle Heights neighborhood. Monika Evstatieva/NPR hide caption

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Monika Evstatieva/NPR

'¡Murales Rebeldes!': These Disappearing LA Murals Mirror Their Community

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The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

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On Stone Mountain near Atlanta, a carving depicts Civil War Confederate figures Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Civil Rights Activist Argues To Keep Confederate Monuments

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