Humans Humans

How do we make sense of all that chatter? Ilana Kohn/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Getty Images

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of Sound

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Astronauts aboard the International Space Station took this image of southern Scandinavia, showing the northern lights aurora, just before midnight under a full moon on April 3, 2015. NASA hide caption

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NASA

At a recent National LGBTQ Task Force conference in Washington D.C., Luis Felipe Cebas (right) from Whitman-Walker Health, talks with Sarah Fleming about PrEP, the pre-exposure drug that can help protect against HIV infection. Tyrone Turner/ WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/ WAMU

PrEP Campaign Aims To Block HIV Infection And Save Lives In D.C.

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Dan Ariely has found that "what separates honest people from not-honest people is not necessarily character, it's opportunity." Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images

Everybody Lies, And That's Not Always A Bad Thing

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Are Humans Biologically Programmed To Fear What They Don't Understand?

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The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

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Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images

The Scarcity Trap: Why We Keep Digging When We're Stuck In A Hole

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Veterans in Murfreesboro, Tenn., enjoy a wheelchair tai chi class; other alternative health programs now commonly offered at VA hospitals in the U.S. include yoga, mindfulness training and art therapy. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

To Treat Pain, PTSD And Other Ills, Some Vets Try Tai Chi

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Courtesy of Michael Rosnach/Harvard University

Failure To Save A Child In Wartime Inspires Wound-Healing Tech

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Cutting back up to 25 percent of your calories per day helps slow your metabolism and reduce free radicals that cause cell damage and aging. But would you want to? VisualField/Getty Images hide caption

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VisualField/Getty Images

You May Live Longer By Severely Restricting Calories, Scientists Say

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In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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