Humans Humans

Aaron Hernandez (81), of the New England Patriots, lost his helmet during this play against the New York Jets in 2011. Hernandez killed himself in 2017, and researchers found that he had had one of the most severe cases of CTE ever seen in someone his age. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

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Elsa/Getty Images

Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

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Dr. Mathilde Krim at the World AIDS Day Symposium presented by the Foundation For AIDS Research and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2002. Krim had a knack for helping people talk about HIV/AIDS rationally, colleagues say. Theo Wargo/WireImage hide caption

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Theo Wargo/WireImage

Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

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Astronomers have discovered a star, shown in an artist's rendition, that appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the sun. L. Calçada/ESO hide caption

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L. Calçada/ESO

"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Johnathon Shillings (left), 28, just completed a five-year sentence and was reunited with his 8-year-old daughter, Victoria. Macario Gonzales, 27, shown with his 2-year-old daughter, Mackelsey, has just started to serve a seven-year sentence in Texas state prison. Courtesy of Johnathon Shillings and Macario Gonzales hide caption

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Courtesy of Johnathon Shillings and Macario Gonzales

How To Parent From Prison And Other Advice For Life Inside

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Rebeca Gonzalez says she can now afford to buy pomegranates for her family in Garden Grove, Calif., because of the extra money she receives through Más Fresco, a food stamp incentive program for purchasing produce. Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News

A skull discovered at a sacred Aztec temple. A new study analyzed DNA extracted from the teeth of people who died in a 16th century epidemic that destroyed the Aztec empire, and found a type of salmonella may have caused the epidemic. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Waves crash onto the beach near Brighton Pier in England, in January 2007. Gale force winds and heavy rain brought disruption to large parts of the country. Severe weather events like this one may be linked to more frequent fluctuations in the polar jet stream, according to a new study. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

MaryJane Sarvis, an artist in Shaftsbury, Vt., weaned herself from the opioid painkillers she was prescribed for chronic nerve pain. "I felt tired all the time and I was still in pain," she says. Marijuana works better for her, but costs $200 per month out-of-pocket. Emily Corwin/VPR hide caption

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Emily Corwin/VPR

The High Cost Of Medical Marijuana Causes Pain In Vermont

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Cameroonian kids were part of an experiment based on the classic "marshmallow test": Put a single treat before a child but tell the child if he or she waits, say, 10 minutes, a second treat will be given. ZenShui/Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto hide caption

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ZenShui/Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto

So It's Just You And A Marshmallow: Would You Pass The Test?

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Women are catching up with men nationally in overall drinking, as well as in binge drinking, drunk driving and deaths from cirrhosis of the liver caused by alcoholism. Vasyl Tretiakov / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Vasyl Tretiakov / EyeEm/Getty Images

Norishige Kanai prior the launch of the Soyuz-FG rocket in Kazakhstan on Dec. 17. As is the norm, the Japanese astronaut grew in outer space, just not by as much as he initially thought. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

Study participants often answer questions differently, depending on the questioner's gender. Sex hormones can affect results, too. sanjeri/Getty Images hide caption

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sanjeri/Getty Images

A Scientist's Gender Can Skew Research Results

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