Humans Humans

(Left to right) NYU medical students Brian Chao, Michael Lui, Hye Min Choi, and Varun Vijay take the team approach to learning about the anatomy of cells, and how disease can disrupt them. Analyzing big data sets is now a routine part of their studies, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Cindy Carpien for NPR

Medical Students Crunch Big Data To Spot Health Trends

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Dr. Janina Morrison, right, speaks with patient Jorge Colorado and his daughter Margarita Lopez about Colorado's diabetes at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

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A young boy talks with Tina Cloer, director of the Children's Bureau, in Indianapolis. The nonprofit shelter takes in children from the state's Department of Child Services when a suitable foster family can't be found. Cloer says the average length of stay at the shelter has increased from two days to 10 in 2015. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Heroin, Opioid Abuse Put Extra Strain On U.S. Foster Care System

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 86 million Americans over age 20 have abnormal blood sugar levels. Over the long run, that can seriously damage the eyes, nerves, kidneys and blood vessels. iStockphoto hide caption

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'East Los High' Serves Up Sex Ed With Its Teen Drama

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Joseph Daniel Fiedler for NPR

Fetal Cells May Protect Mom From Disease Long After The Baby's Born

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Neuroscientist Takashi Kitamura works in the lab of Nobel laureate Susumu Tonegawa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of their recent projects helped identify a brain circuit involved in processing the "where" and "when" of memory. "Ocean cells" (red) and "island cells" (blue) play key roles. Takashi Kitamura/MIT hide caption

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Takashi Kitamura/MIT

30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

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A woman's health history and tolerance for different kinds of risks should have a legitimate role in determining the timing of when she starts and stops getting screening mammograms, some leading doctors say. Sally Elford/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Is Mammogram Advice Still Such A Tangle? Ask Your Doctor

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New Guidelines Reflect Knowledge On Positives, Risks Of Mammograms

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Study Suggests Talk Therapy Eases Symptoms Of Schizophrenia

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