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Healthy diets help prevent, even reverse, some health conditions. Dr. Dean Ornish believes it can also do the same for cancer. Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED

Can Healthy Eating Reverse Some Cancers?

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"The goal of me as a cancer doctor is not to understand cancer ... the goal is to control cancer," says Dr. David Agus. Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED

Is Our Narrow Focus On Cancer Doing More Harm Than Good?

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"We have 21st-century medical treatments and drugs to treat cancer, but we still have 20th-century procedures and processes for diagnosis," says Jorge Soto. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

What's A Better Way To Detect Cancer?

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Dr. Jay Bradner believes open-source research is necessary in the fight against cancer. Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED

How Will Open-Source Research Help Cure Cancer?

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

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A Sense Of Self: What Happens When Your Brain Says You Don't Exist

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3-D renderings of four skeletons found buried near the altar of an early church in the Jamestown settlement in Virginia. Smithsonian X 3D hide caption

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Smithsonian X 3D

Bones In Church Ruins Likely The Remains Of Early Jamestown's Elite

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A Yale University study analyzed the experience of 60 million Americans covered by traditional Medicare between 1999 and 2013, and found "jaw-dropping improvements in almost every area," the lead author says. Ann Cutting/Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Cutting/Getty Images

Happy 50th Birthday, Medicare. Your Patients Are Getting Healthier

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At sign-up events like this one in Los Angeles in 2013, Covered California pledged "affordability" in health insurance as one of its main selling points. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

Amid Lingering Skepticism, A Primer On What Bland's Autopsy Can Tell Us

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Despite losing his sense of taste and smell to Alzheimer's disease, Greg O'Brien says grilling supper on the back deck with his son on a summer evening is still fun. Sam Broun/Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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Sam Broun/Courtesy of Greg O'Brien

When Alzheimer's Steals Your Appetite, Remember To Laugh

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Christy O'Donnell, who has advanced lung cancer, is one of several California patients suing for the right to get a doctor's help with prescription medicine to end their own lives if and when they feel that's necessary. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

"It now pays to get a lot of pleasure out of a little bit of sugar," says Danielle Reed, a scientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The Gene For Sweet: Why We Don't All Taste Sugar The Same Way

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Giedre (left) and Tal Cohen in March 2013, while Giedre was still healthy. Since then, she's begun having symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. In Giedre's case, the illness is tied to a rare genetic mutation she inherited. Courtesy of Tal Cohen hide caption

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Courtesy of Tal Cohen

Younger Adults With Alzheimer's Are Key To Drug Search

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